Around Michigan & State Government

Coverage from across Michigan and  the state Capitol with the Michigan Public Radio Network and Interlochen Public Radio.

Traverse City Area Public Schools

Some parents on Old Mission Peninsula want to know if they can pay higher taxes to keep their elementary school open. Traverse City Area Public Schools has proposed closing three elementary buildings to save money, including the school on Old Mission Peninsula.

The idea of raising taxes to keep a school open sounds simple but is something school districts are not allowed to do in Michigan. An amendment to the state constitution known as Proposal A made vast reforms to public education funding and prohibits a local school district from asking voters for more money to operate schools.

Parents on Old Mission Peninsula are talking about a way to work around that law.

Peter Payette discusses it with David Cassleman.


Peter Payette

Mark Baker announced in December he was selling his farm. But now he says he has a new plan: he wants to help other military veterans take up farming.

 

MIRS

A group that monitors the flow of money in Michigan politics has a new leader. Rich Robinson, former head of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network, has announced that Lansing reporter Craig Mauger is succeeding him.

Mauger has been a reporter with the Michigan Information and Research Service since 2012.

Rich Robinson led the Michigan Campaign Finance Network for 15 years. Robinson spoke with IPR News Radio's David Cassleman about the current state of campaign finance regulation in Michigan.

"We're in a process, much like the federal process, of deregulating campaign finance to a pretty significant degree," says Robinson.


Department of Environmental Quality

Michigan has more than 280 contaminated sites that are “orphans.” That means the company that made the mess no longer exists and the state has to deal with it.

But Michigan is running out of money to tackle these environmental problems. That was not good news for Antrim County, home to one of the largest contaminated sites in the country. State management of an underground plume of trichlorethylene (TCE) has been crucial here for years and will be needed in the future.

Passing any kind of millage in northern Michigan is a tough task, and it might become an even tougher job in the future. Last week Governor Rick Snyder signed a campaign finance law that prohibits public groups, like schools, from talking about millage votes within 60 days of an election.

"It's important that we get the information out to our community members," Steve Prissel, superintendent of Elk Rapids Schools, says. "This 60 day mandate ... just closes the door on us having the ability to be transparent."

The district failed to pass a $10 million school bond twice in 2013 and 2014.

Some opponents have called this law a 'gag order,' saying it will unfairly hamstring the ability of school districts and local governments to pass tax increases.

Rick Pluta, capitol bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, explains the law further:


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