Lead Stories

Mary Stewart Adams
6:48 am
Fri July 25, 2014

The Delta Aquarid "Wishing Star"

The constellation Aquarius with the star Skat "a wish", near radiant of Tuesday night's meteor show

Hello, this is Mary Stewart Adams with “The Storyteller’s Guide to the Night Sky.”

Overnight Tuesday to Wednesday, July 29 to 30th, is the peak of the annual Delta Aquarid Meteor shower. This meteor shower takes its name from the third brightest star ~or delta star~ in the constellation Aquarius, and the shower can be seen across the entire Earth.

It is commonly held that meteor showers result from Earth’s passage through the trail of stuff left in the wake of a passing comet. But with the Delta Aquarids, the ‘parent comet’ that might be causing the shower, is not known with any certainty.

However, to name a meteor shower, astronomers don’t use the name of the comet anyway, rather, they use the name of the constellation or star in front of which the meteors seem to shoot.

To find the story in this meteor shower, then, we have to consider the name of the delta Aquarius star. This star has the name Skat, which is derived from old Arabic star globes. The name Skat means ‘a wish’~so we could rightfully say that the delta aquarid meteor shower is a shower of wishing stars!

In 1756, the German-born astronomer Tobias Mayer noted a fixed star near where h was observing the radiant of the meteor shower. Twenty-five years later, William Herschel observed this same object and thought it was a comet, but afterwards realized it was a new planet, our Uranus.

Since it was found in the region of Aquarius stars, Uranus is said to have dominion over this region of the zodiac, and is related to all new technology~it being the first planet discovered with the use of a telescope.

The best time to look for the Delta Aquarid wishing stars is between midnight and dawn, especially Tuesday evening to Wednesday morning. And also note that many of these shooting stars leave persistent trains – glowing ionized gas trails that last a second or two after the meteor has passed. 

I’m Mary Stewart Adams, from Emmet County’s International Dark Sky Park at the Headlands.


Michigan Healthcare
4:39 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

What Do The Obamacare Rulings Mean For Michigan?

An appeals court ruling Tuesday out of Washington DC could jeopardize tax subsidies that help nearly 240,000 Michiganders buy health coverage under Obamacare.

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The Environment Report
12:50 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

After 4 years, major cleanup on the Kalamazoo River coming to a close

Workers assess damage at Enbridge oil spill site in 2010. The major aspects of the cleanup are expected to be wrapped up this summer.
EPA

Originally published on Thu July 24, 2014 11:24 am

Steve Hamilton talks about what we've learned about cleaning up tar sands oil and the questions that remain.

It's been four years since the Enbridge pipeline Line 6B broke, creating the largest inland oil spill in U.S. history.

More than a million gallons of tar sands oil have been cleaned up from Talmadge Creek and the Kalamazoo River. This summer, crews are dredging areas of Morrow Lake.

Steve Hamilton is a professor of ecosystem ecology at the Kellogg Biological Station at Michigan State University. He’s served as an independent scientific advisor to the Environmental Protection Agency throughout the cleanup. I talked with him for today's Environment Report.

A few years ago, right in the heart of the cleanup, an EPA official said the agency was "writing the book" on how to remove tar sands oil from the bottom of a river.

Hamilton agrees: "First, before it even got to the bottom, we learned that in the first year, it stuck to surfaces of plants and debris that made a tarry mess that largely had to be manually removed." 

He says it was the removal of the submerged oil that made the cleanup last as long as it has.

"It is so incredibly difficult to remove submerged oil from a complex river, extending over nearly 40 miles."

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Stateside
11:13 am
Wed July 23, 2014

The fight to increase Michigan's minimum wage is not over

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:19 pm

Governor Rick Snyder signed a new minimum wage law in May that would raise the state’s minimum wage from $7.40 to $9.25 an hour by 2018.

But the fight is not over.

Raise Michigan, a group of unions, nonprofits and liberal advocacy groups, wants to put forth a ballot initiative that will ask voters to amend the law and raise minimum wage eventually to $10.10 an hour.

Chris Gautz is the Capitol Correspondent for Crain’s Detroit Business. He joined Cynthia on Stateside today to talk about the group’s plans to meet at the Capitol this Thursday with the Board of State Canvassers.

Read his article in Crain’s Detroit Business here.

*Listen to the full interview with Chris Gautz above.

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The Michigan Environment
7:17 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Carbon tax finds bipartisan support when funds are delegated to a specific cause

Some people think a tax on carbon dioxide is a good market-based approach to tackling climate change because it would require larger companies, such as power plants, to pay for their emissions. But it's a tough sell politically.

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 1:35 am

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