Students rehearse during marching band camp at Interlochen last week.
John Roddy

High school football kicks off this weekend and with it marching band season. 

Some high schoolers spent last week getting ready for the band season at band camp hosted by Interlochen Center for the Arts.

Amy Wang was in marching band in high school and college. She’s been helping out as a color guard instructor for about 10 years.

One of her favorite things about band camp, is seeing the progression of the students.

“It’s pretty amazing what they can do in one week,” she says. 

Amy says anybody wanting to be in the color guard should be prepared to work hard, have lots of spirit, but to remember to enjoy the moment.

Not only do they have to memorize all the music and choreography, but they have to perform in all sorts of weather conditions- all while carrying and playing their instruments. 

 


More and more people are putting up solar panels in Michigan. It's getting a lot more affordable to do it. And there's a payback when you get your monthly utility bill.

But a bill in the state Senate could fundamentally change the solar program in Michigan, and it has some people worried. 

How "net metering" works in Michigan

Almost six years ago, Michigan’s only women’s prison settled a huge lawsuit after officers raped multiple female inmates.

Changes have been made since then, but are they enough?

Today in 1964, Van Cliburn conducted at Interlochen

Aug 26, 2015

Van Cliburn's visit that year produced a recording of Serenade to Music that wound up on a record produced by RCA Victor. It was called Van Cliburn Conducts.

Cliburn visited Interlochen throughout the 1960s. But his show with the Interlochen Youth Orchestra had a last minute problem. There was no choir.

Interlochen’s archivist, Byron Hanson, says the concert was scheduled for the week after camp let out and by that time most of the choir had gone home. So they had to assemble a choir from the community.
 

Aaron Selbig

The future of Michigan’s cherry industry may be tied to what happens in the courtroom.

An Elk Rapids cherry processor is suing the federal government over its power to regulate the industry. The man who filed the lawsuit is encouraged by a recent decision from the U.S. Supreme Court involving raisins.

    

Bill Sherman has run Burnette Foods with his brothers for 59 years. Way in the back of his factory are rows of pallets, stacked floor to ceiling with thousands of cans of pie filling. It’s pie filling that Sherman can’t sell.

 

OK, this is where I fess up and tell you that the answer to that headline is "only time will tell."

A scientific advisory panel is studying the possibility now (see their names here), and we expect to see their findings this October. After that report, there will be more "time telling" as state officials decide whether to allow it.

Brian Kay

A decision to remove the word “fighting” from the football stadium at Petoskey High School has some parents up in arms. A slogan over Curtis Field used to say “home of the fighting Northmen” but the word “fighting” was painted over this weekend.

Senator Gary Peters says he's still "weighing all the issues" on President Obama's nuclear deal with Iran. Congress is expected to vote on the agreement early in September, when lawmakers return from summer recess.

“This will probably be one of the most serious votes that I will make no matter how long I’m in the United States Senate," Peters said in an interview last week with Interlochen Public Radio.

Peters also took time to discuss the controversial oil pipeline that crosses the Straits of Mackinac.

“I am not satisfied that it’s safe," Peters said.  "I’m very concerned about it. Quite frankly I don’t even believe that it probably should be in the Straits."


Dorian Gray, the Moon, and Neptune

Aug 24, 2015

All week the Moon will grow brighter and brighter until it arrives at the last Full phase of summer on Saturday, when it will occupy the same region of the zodiac as the planet Neptune. Neptune is not visible to the naked eye, but its reputation as a planet of illusion and confusion sets up a mood of mystery and deep storytelling for the weekend. All month long we see the Moon waxing and waning through the sky.


When we talk about post-traumatic stress disorder, the conversation usually focuses on our members of the military, both active-duty and veterans.

But that misses a large group of men and women who struggle with PTSD: our first responders.

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Michigan author explores tough reunions and the grace of forgiveness

Listen to our conversation with Lori Nelson Spielman.The power of forgiveness. The power of trust. The often-complicated, sometimes-thorny relationship between a mother and a daughter.Those are some of the themes that Lansing's Lori Nelson Spielman explores in her latest novel Sweet Forgiveness.
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