Michigan is saying goodbye to nine of its smaller and older coal-burning power plants.

DTE Energy is closing two facilities. Consumers Energy will shutter seven more, which are nicknamed the "Classic Seven." I recently toured one of these aging workhorses of electricity, B.C. Cobb in Muskegon.

Traverse City Tourism

Law enforcement officers say a new Michigan law will make it easier to keep intoxicated boaters off the water. The new law lowers the allowable blood-alcohol content for boaters from .10 to .08. That's the same blood-alcohol standard used to judge car drivers.

John O’Hagan is undersheriff in Manistee County, where two officers patrol local waterways during the summer. O’Hagan says having a consistent standard for everyone will make their jobs easier.

The Next Idea 

As we near the vote to raise the sales tax to fund our abysmal roads, we’ve heard this question come up quite a bit these last few months:

“Why couldn’t the Legislature just do the job they were elected to do instead of passing responsibility off to the voters?”

The short answer -- and you’re not going to like this -- is that it is not their fault.

It’s ours.

People have been lining up outside the U.S. Supreme Court for days hoping that they will be among the lucky ones to get a seat for Tuesday's historic arguments on gay marriage.

As of now, gay marriage is legal in 36 states. By the end of this Supreme Court term, either same-sex couples will be able to wed in all 50 states, or gay marriage bans may be reinstituted in many of the states where they've previously been struck down.

Paul Maritinez/Flickr

Many adoptions in Michigan are handled by private agencies – and many of those agencies are religiously affiliated, such as Catholic Charities. State lawmakers are considering a bill that would give these agencies the right to deny service to couples based on its own religious beliefs.

Supporters say the bill would protect these agencies' first amendment rights. But critics say the bill would lead to discrimination against same-sex couples.

A pair of nonprofits say not enough people have taken advantage of their offer to help pay health insurance premiums.

“We’ve been able to find, I think, about a dozen people who we’re helping,” says Bruce Miller, the executive director of two nonprofits who together serve 18 northern Michigan counties.

Miller says the coverage is for people who have employer-sponsored healthcare, but who can’t afford to add their families to the plan. They also don’t qualify for subsidized plans under Obamacare. He calls it the “family glitch.”

Old sport, gains new following

Apr 24, 2015
Members of the Traverse City Curling Club wrapped up their first season on Wednesday, at Center Ice Arena.
Daniel Wanschura

The sport of curling dates back to the 16th century. That’s when people in Scotland would play on the frozen lochs and ponds. 

The Traverse City Curling Club has only been around for a year, but they’re hosting a big tournament this weekend, called the "Cherry Bombspiel."

Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park

Welcome to the Green Room, a weekly arts journal from Interlochen Public Radio. Listen below to this week's episode about the arts, artists and performance.


Spring has a lot of faces around the country, like the cherry blossoms in Washington, D.C., and the sap run in Vermont. On one Michigan island, it's horses that are the harbinger of the season.

Mackinac Island draws a million visitors a year for its scenery, fudge and horses. Cars aren't allowed on the island, and every spring, hundreds of horses are ferried from their winter hiatus in the Upper Peninsula for a good grooming and harness fitting, before beginning their summer jobs pulling carriages.

Margaret Noodin has made it her life’s work to fight for the future of the ancient Native American language Anishnaabemowin.

This is the language of “the People of the Three Fires”—the Odawa, Potawatomi and Ojibwe. These people came to the Great Lakes thousands of years ago.

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Classical Music & Culture

Kids' Commute: Trombone Tuesday with Brett Kelly

It’s all about the Trombone this week on Kids’ Commute! To help us learn more about the Trombone, we’re talking with Brett Kelly, a student at Interlochen Arts Academy. Throughout this week, we’ll hear some of Brett’s favorite music, why he loves the instrument, and why he thinks you too, should consider playing the Trombone!
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Live from the Metropolitan Opera

Un Ballo in Maschera

Saturday, May 2, 2015 1:00pm