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We’ve Got Issues: Why rural Michigan voters like Trump

Voters in rural areas have been some of the strongest supporters of Donald Trump this presidential election. In Michigan, Trump dominated the entire Upper Peninsula and most of the northern part of the Lower Peninsula during the primary election. This political development has puzzled many. How did a New York billionaire become a populist firebrand for rural voters? In Michigan, Bridge Magazine went searching for an answer. Correspondent Ted Roelofs came back with a portrait of rural Michigan counties suffering from high rates of poverty and unemployment. He spoke to IPR News Radio about what he learned:
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National Writers Series: An evening with Paola Gianturco

20 hours ago

Photojournalist Paola Gianturco’s work with women has taken her around the world, documenting their struggles and success stories. Her latest book, “Grandmother Power: A Global Phenomenon” profiles activist grandmothers from fifteen countries across five continents. The women in Gianturco’s books tell their stories in their own words, accompanied by her photographs. Fellow photographer Tony Demin will talk to Gianturco about her work. And we’ll hear from Jackson Kaguri, founder of the Nyaka AIDS Orphan Project.

NMC says faculty opted out of board agenda

Oct 21, 2016
Northwestern Michigan College

Faculty at Northwestern Michigan College could again report directly to the college board at regular meetings, according to the NMC administration. But the faculty says the offer comes with too many restrictions.

The faculty report agenda item has been a point of contention since 2007. That’s when the college board stopped hearing directly from teachers at its monthly meeting. After that, faculty could speak at board meetings for 3 minutes periods during the public comment section of the agenda.

The oil pipeline under the Straits of Mackinac has become a key election issue in northern Michigan this year. Candidates for Michigan’s 101st state House spoke about it at a debate in Glen Arbor Thursday night.

Republican Curt Vanderwall says the pipeline provides economic stability.

“We need to make sure that we understand that there’s 250 high paying jobs in those communities throughout the whole line from the tip to the bottom that are in this state,” said Vanderwall.

Vanderwall’s opponent, Democrat Dan Scripps, took a firm stance on shutting down Line 5.

The Next Idea

If you listen to the World Economic Forum, we are now in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The WEF calls this “a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.” Just as mass production launched an era of large-scale centralized organizations at the turn of the 20th century, the Internet and smartphones in the 21st century are ushering in new forms of collaboration — and conflict.

Technologies are replacing the fundamental missions of organizations. They are moving from scale — creating something once and distributing it everywhere — to scope, creating an infinite variety of offerings. Everything from your made-to-order sneakers to the medications you take for your unique ailments are being mass customized. That is, companies are using integrated technologies and supply chains, along with complex information from diverse sources, a.k.a. Big Data, to create a product or service just for you, just in time.

Irene Miller poses with a dog, during her childhood. She'll share her Holocaust survival story tonight at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City.
Irene Miller

Irene Miller fled Poland when she was about five years old in order to escape the Holocaust. She and her family dealt with soldiers breaking into her home in the middle of the night, a freezing labor camp, starvation, and more. 

Still, she says she has no bitterness towards those who wronged her.

"I am not angry, I am absolutely not bitter," Irene says. "I feel I have a lot of joy of living and a lot of love to share with others."

Irene Miller recounts her remarkable story in the book, Into No Man's Land. She'll share her story tonight at the Dennos Museum Center in Traverse City.

She says it's important to remember what took place, so we can avoid similar situations in the future.

Click here for more information about tonight's event.

C. S. Lewis believed the nuanced imagination was important for perceiving reality.
The Wade Center

C. S. Lewis was a Christian theologian who authored over 70 books, including The Space Trilogy, and The Chronicles of Narnia.

This weekend in Petoskey, the annual C. S. Lewis Festival will celebrate Lewis’ imagination. 

The authors of the book, The Surprising Imagination of C. S. Lewis say he had a nuanced understanding regarding imagination. They Identify over 30 different types of imagination that Lewis recognized and used in his writings.

Mark Neal is one of those authors, and a featured speaker at the festival in Petoskey. He says the nuanced approach to imagination helps us better understand reality. 

"It's this idea that it helps us to see things that, without it, would be unseeable," Neal says.


The hunt is on for lead pipes in Detroit.

Flint officials still don’t know where all the city’s lead service lines are. That’s because the building records were in horrible shape.

Morgan Springer

The pressure is on for districts and teachers to have their students reading proficiently. That’s after Michigan’s third grade reading bill passed this month. The bill says that students who don’t read well by third grade might be held back. It would take effect in three years. So for schools that are struggling, that means turning things around fast. There’s a grade school near Traverse City that has been trying to figure out how to do that.


2016 has been on a record-breaking warm streak, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 

So what does this unseasonably warm fall mean for birds that need to start packing up and heading south?

Andrew Farnsworth is a research associate with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and he runs BirdCast – it’s a tool the lab created to forecast what’s happening with bird migration each week. 

Sam Corden

Researchers who work in wetlands in Michigan are taking a new approach to invasive plants. Instead of removing plants like phragmites and switchgrass, they’re harvesting them. They say these plants are a threat to biodiversity, but they can benefit farmers and even power homes.


Wednesday, October 26th at 6:30 p.m at the City Opera House in Traverse City

Live Call-in Show; 1st Congressional race

Next up: hear from Libertarian Party candidate Diane Bostow

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