Featured News

Frank Pahl's automatons play a prominent role in Neruda's Suitcase, a show playing Thursday and Friday at Interlochen Center for the Arts.
Dan Wanschura

Michigan composer toys around with his music

Frank Pahl is a different kind of composer. What other people see as toys or junk, Frank sees as music-making potential. “I didn’t grow to appreciate Tinker Toys until I was, wow, pushing 40,” he says.

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Welcome to Episode 39 - the Season Three Finale! - of Show Tunes with Kate Botello.  Coming up: it’s our Audience Appreciation Special! We asked, you answered - and tonight we’ve got a pile of YOUR favorite show tunes. At Intermission, we’ll talk with Rene Ruiz, founder of Toxic Audio, about combining the worlds of a capella singing and theatre.

Click through for this week's playlist and a beautiful video of Jake Gyllenhaal from the new production of SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE.


Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thanks to listeners in Baldwin, Cadillac, Central Lake, Ann Arbor, and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Antonin Dvorak, Symphony no. 4, third movement; Neeme Järvi, Scottish National Orchestra

2. Victor Herbert, “Thine alone”; Beverly Sills

3. Johannes Brahms, Piano sonata no. 2, fourth movement; Marilyn Neeley

4. Andrew Lloyd Webber, “All I Ask of You” from Phantom of the Opera; Barry Wordsworth, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Julian Lloyd Webber

5. Carl Friedemann, Slavonic Rhapsody no. 2; I Salonisti

There's a bulletin board at the front of the band room at Spring Lake Park High covered in portraits of the composers who wrote this year's music selection.

The bulletin board isn't new, it's there every year. What's new are the faces: Instead of primarily white men, there are faces of women and composers of color.

This is intentional. The band directors at Spring Lake, outside of St. Paul, Minnesota, have pledged to include at least one piece by a female composer and one by a composer of color in each concert, for each of the school's bands.

The International Joint Commission, a treaty organization that advises the United States and Canada, says the two countries should do more to keep microplastics out of the lakes.

Microplastics are tiny pieces of plastic that are five millimeters or smaller. Microbeads are used in things like soap and toothpaste. Microfibers are tiny fibers that wash off our synthetic clothing, like fleece.

Those tiny plastics can end up in the Great Lakes and can get into fish.

The warnings about "superbug infections" and over prescribing antibiotics have been getting stronger and louder in recent years. Yet, it's still happening and we are seeing people die from infections that are caused by these so-called superbugs.

The Centers for Disease Control, for example, is telling us that every year 75,000 Americans with hospital-aquired infections are dying while they're in the hospital.

As Michigan's brewing industry continues to grow and flourish, we're seeing a big jump in growing hops in our state.

Consider this: Prior to 2008, Michigan hadn't had a commercial hops-growing operation for more than a century. Now, we're fourth in the nation.

This Saturday, February 18, Grand Traverse Pipes and Drums will hold a concert and fundraiser. The event starts at 7 PM at the Elks Lodge in Traverse City.

Jack Fellows joined Classical IPR's Amanda Sewell to talk about the history of the Grand Traverse Pipes and Drums and to listen to recordings of the ensemble.

For more information about the Ceilidh (pronounced "kay-lee"), click here

Grand Traverse County

Grand Traverse County Administrator Tom Menzel announced his resignation last month.

When Menzel was hired in 2015, he had a reputation for righting the financial ship at the National Cherry Festival and Bay Area Transportation Authority. Grand Traverse County commissioners hoped he would do the same for the county.

He immediately started making moves, but some of them – like asking county employees to pay more for their health and retirement benefits – have met with resistance.

Music has been part of singer-songwriter Aoife O’Donovan’s life and career aspiration from her earliest days.

 The Irish-American musician was born to two Boston-based musicians and spent her summers in Ireland with her cousins. Today, her music—which she describes as loosely falling into the folk genre—draws inspiration from both the bluegrass and old-time music of her youth and her Irish heritage. O’Donovan is also inspired by the community of musicians that surrounds her. “The community of music has no barrier of age, race or gender,” she told IPR’s Nancy Deneen. O’Donovan stopped by IPR’s Studio A to chat with Deneen prior to her Valentine’s Day show with Chris Eldridge and Julian Lage in Corson Auditorium.


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Live from the Metropolitan Opera

I Puritani

Saturday, February 18, 2017 1pm

New Release of the Week

Bernstein: Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2

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Where we talk about arts and culture in northern Michigan