Election 2016

Kid Rock, the singer whose career has spanned rap, hard rock and country music, is fueling the speculation that he intends to announce a bid for the U.S. Senate next year to challenge incumbent Democrat Debbie Stabenow of Michigan. That is unless it's all a publicity stunt.

Paul Maritinez/Flickr

A campaign committee controlled by Republican leaders is facing fines and questions over how it lost track of many thousands of dollars during the last election.

Women's March on Washington

A Traverse City contingent will attend the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday. March organizers expect around 200,000 marchers to gather on the National Mall the day after President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration.

Organizers have released a set of guiding principles stressing that "women’s rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are women's rights."

Sam Corden

Political candidates raised millions of dollars - and spent millions of dollars - in Michigan this election season, but they weren’t the only ones. 

There was also plenty of political spending by independent groups. Those are the groups not connected to any candidate, which can accept unlimited amounts of cash from donors. The top 20 groups in Michigan spent $9.9 million between January 2015 and Election Day, according to a report by the watchdog Michigan Campaign Finance Network.

About half of the money raised by those groups came from a dozen sources, the report says.

“Those 12 sources are driving the independent spending in Michigan, and the main force behind it is the DeVos family,” says Craig Mauger, executive director of the Michigan Campaign Finance Network.

 


The vote recount in Michigan has ended. But it did reveal some problems.

The Secretary of State is planning to audit several Detroit polling places because of irregularities. The number of ballots in the recount containers did not match the number of voters who signed in. In other counties, there were some additional discrepancies as well.

On Nov. 30, Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein requested a recount of votes in Michigan. That request was the beginning of a frantic week of legal battles as county clerks rallied staff and resources to undertake the recount.

But now the statewide recount appears to be over after the ruling that came from Federal Judge Mark Goldsmith last night. He lifted the restraining order that triggered Monday’s start to the recount. The Board of State Canvassers then canceled its meeting earlier today.

Though the recount effort seems to have reached its limit, Stein said not yet.

The legal battles over the statewide recount of Michigan's presidential election results have been raging.

At the same time, another story is clearly emerging: Precincts that cannot be recounted because of Michigan's recount law, which dates back to 1954.

For county clerks all over Michigan, the presidential vote recount has them scrambling to hand-count some 4.8 million ballots in less than two weeks.

Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum took a few minutes away from the scramble to discuss the process on Stateside.

There’s so much at stake in a recount. So much that must be done correctly, and with the Electoral College vote looming, the clock is ticking.

Melvin “Butch” Hollowell knows what that’s like. Currently the corporation counsel for the city of Detroit, he’s worked on many crucial recounts: the Bush-Gore recount in Florida in 2000, the 2005 recount of the Detroit mayoral election between Kwame Kilpatrick and Freman Hendrix, the 2013 recount involving Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan, and more.

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein has requested a full hand recount of Michigan's presidential vote.

Stein requested the recount on Wednesday. She had already requested recounts in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Republican Donald Trump won all three states. He defeated Democrat Hillary Clinton in Michigan by 10,704 votes out of nearly 4.8 million ballots cast. Stein alleges that irregularities and the potential for hacking into scanning devices call into question the results.

The Michigan recount could start as early as Friday.

A state elections board officially declared Republican Donald Trump the winner of the presidential election in Michigan. That starts the clock on a request for a statewide recount that has been called for by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. The campaign has until 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon to file the request.

This afternoon, the Michigan Board of State Canvassers will, in all likelihood, certify the results of the November 8th election - bringing Campaign 2016 to an official close and opening the door to Recount 2016.

Unprecedented

Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania are about to become the center of the U.S. political universe as the Green Party and its presidential candidate, Dr. Jill Stein, try to upset the order of things and make elections officials in those three states go back and check their work.

 

There’s no better way to understand what lies ahead than to take a look at our history.

Gleaves Whitney sat down with us today to talk about what history might tell us about Donald Trump’s Election Day victory and the turmoil and division that’s been left in the wake of this long, tough campaign.

In Michigan, Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton by less than three-tenths of one percent of the total votes. With polls and pundits across the state and the nation predicting a win for Clinton, people of all political stripes were stunned by the election's result.

Stateside went out onto the streets and handed the microphone over to people so they could share their thoughts on the day after this historic election. There were feelings of joy, of fear, of sadness, of relief, of uncertainty. You can hear them above. 

 

Over the last few weeks, Michigan all of a sudden became a battleground state.

Both candidates and their surrogates barnstormed across Michigan to rally supporters and get out the vote.

 


Michigan has voted a Republican into the White House for the first time since 1988.

Michigan Republican Party Chairman Ronna Romney McDaniel told us the results were “absolutely” beyond what the party hoped for.

 


Donald Trump’s victory is seen as one of the watershed moments in American political history.

Michigan voters certainly played a role in this upset.

It’s Just Politics team Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sat down with us today to dive into what happened in our state.

 

If you favored the Regional Transit Authority millage, you saw a big step towards the connected, regional transportation system that’s never existed in Southeast Michigan.

If you opposed it, you saw a tax hike for services you likely don’t need or care about.

The opposition won. Southeast Michigan voters said “no” to the RTA millage.

Megan Owens of Transportation Riders United spoke with us today.

Green Party wins Grand Traverse County seat

Nov 9, 2016

Grand Traverse County has a new commissioner from the Green Party. Tom Mair won the seat with 53 percent of the vote.

He ousted incumbent Christine Maxbauer, the chair of the Grand Traverse County board. She received 46 percent of the vote.

"I'm actually pretty surprised," Mair told Interlochen Public Radio early Wednesday morning.

Ben Thorp

Republican Jack Bergman, who won Michigan’s 1st Congressional District by taking 55 percent of the vote yesterday, says his number one legislative priority is revving up the economy. 

He spoke with IPR News Radio’s David Cassleman on Wednesday morning. Listen to the conversation below.

 


Interlochen Public Radio

Voter turnout in northern Michigan on Tuesday was the highest it has been in at least two decades and Republican voters dominated the election up north. Donald Trump won every county but Marquette and Republican Jack Bergman won a resounding victory in the race for U.S. Congress.

Bergman won Michigan’s 1st Congressional seat by more than 55,000 votes over his Democratic opponent Lon Johnson. In 2012, this race—between different major party candidates—was decided by less than 2,000 votes.

 

Election Day marks the finish line of a grueling, fractious and long campaign.

It started with Ted Cruz announcing his candidacy in March 2015.

Twenty months later, many Americans are expressing their exhaustion with the process.

Many people are looking wistfully to other countries like Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland and France, which elect their leaders in a few weeks and then move on.

Michigan State University associate professor of political science Matt Grossmann sat down with us today to talk about how the process for electing our president became so protracted.

Republican Jack Bergman has won in the sprawling 1st Congressional District. Bergman collected 55 percent of the vote. Bergman is a retired Marine Corps general who lives in the Upper Peninsula town of Watersmeet.

Voters in Traverse City have passed Proposal 3, which will require a public vote for any building over 60 feet in the city.

Prop 3 passed with 53 percent of the vote. It will amend Traverse City’s charter, taking away the city commission’s ability to approve a building taller than 60 feet without a vote of the people.

The debate over Prop Three has been contentious. Both sides have said the proposal is likely to be decided in a courtroom.

Sam Cordon

For presidential race results go to NPR's election page for detailed information.

For more state election information visit Michigan's Secretary of State website.

U.S. 1st Congressional District:

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