Classical Music

James Gilray's "The Pic-nic Orchestra" (1802)
Credit [London] : Pubd. April 23d 1802 by H. Humphrey St. James's Street, [1802] / https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/catalog/nlm:nlmuid-101455846-img

Interlochen Public Radio is your gateway to news and classical music from Interlochen Center for the Arts. Learn about new music, upcoming performances and more.

Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

The 2016-17 Metropolitan Opera Radio Broadcast season continues with Kristine Opolais starring in her first Met broadcast of her breakthrough role, the title character in Dvořák’s Rusalka. The dark love story about a water nymph and a human man, derived in large part from Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Little Mermaid,” will also star Jamie Barton in her network role debut as the witch Ježibaba, with Katarina Dalayman as the Foreign Princess, Brandon Jovanovich as the Prince, and Eric Owens as Rusalka’s father, the Water Gnome. Sir Mark Elder conducts.

The Academy Awards are coming up on February 28, and it's your turn to pick a winner!

Five films have been nominated for the Best Musical Score Oscar - which is your favorite? Listen to the scores and vote for the one YOU think should win the Oscar this year. See how your pick measures up with Academy voters!

We'll be featuring suites from the scores all week on Classical IPR.

Click through for links to the scores, and to vote in our poll!

 

French record label Harmonia Mundi brings a captivating new album of 18th-century music for harp and orchestra. La Harpe Reine (“The Queen’s Harp”) celebrates the harp’s renaissance in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This renaissance was inspired by Marie Antoinette, who arrived at the French court with her harp in 1770. The result was a flurry of new compositions for harp.

 

Welcome to Episode 39 - the Season Three Finale! - of Show Tunes with Kate Botello.  Coming up: it’s our Audience Appreciation Special! We asked, you answered - and tonight we’ve got a pile of YOUR favorite show tunes. At Intermission, we’ll talk with Rene Ruiz, founder of Toxic Audio, about combining the worlds of a capella singing and theatre.

Click through for this week's playlist and a beautiful video of Jake Gyllenhaal from the new production of SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE.


Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thanks to listeners in Baldwin, Cadillac, Central Lake, Ann Arbor, and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Antonin Dvorak, Symphony no. 4, third movement; Neeme Järvi, Scottish National Orchestra

2. Victor Herbert, “Thine alone”; Beverly Sills

3. Johannes Brahms, Piano sonata no. 2, fourth movement; Marilyn Neeley

4. Andrew Lloyd Webber, “All I Ask of You” from Phantom of the Opera; Barry Wordsworth, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Julian Lloyd Webber

5. Carl Friedemann, Slavonic Rhapsody no. 2; I Salonisti

There's a bulletin board at the front of the band room at Spring Lake Park High covered in portraits of the composers who wrote this year's music selection.

The bulletin board isn't new, it's there every year. What's new are the faces: Instead of primarily white men, there are faces of women and composers of color.

This is intentional. The band directors at Spring Lake, outside of St. Paul, Minnesota, have pledged to include at least one piece by a female composer and one by a composer of color in each concert, for each of the school's bands.

This Saturday, February 18, Grand Traverse Pipes and Drums will hold a concert and fundraiser. The event starts at 7 PM at the Elks Lodge in Traverse City.

Jack Fellows joined Classical IPR's Amanda Sewell to talk about the history of the Grand Traverse Pipes and Drums and to listen to recordings of the ensemble.

For more information about the Ceilidh (pronounced "kay-lee"), click here

It was The Magnificent Seven that inspired Ramin Djawadi, the musician behind Game Of Thrones' iconic soundtrack, to become a film composer.

Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Bellini’s I Puritani, starring soprano Diana Damrau and tenor Javier Camarena, who add new roles to their Met repertories as Elvira, the heroine driven to madness, and her beloved Lord Arturo Talbot. Maurizio Benini conducts the bel canto masterpiece, which also stars baritone Alexey Markov as Riccardo Forth, the Puritan leader in love with Elvira, and bass-baritone Luca Pisaroni as Elvira’s uncle, Giorgio Walton.

Listen LIVE on Classical IPR on Saturday, February 18 at 1pm ET.

 

Naxos brings a star-studded new recording of Leonard Bernstein’s first two symphonies. Pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet and soprano Jennifer Johnson Cano join forces with conductor Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in Leonard Bernstein: Symphonies 1 and 2.

Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne
digitalgallery.nypl.org

Welcome to Episode 38 - our Valentine's Edition! - of Show Tunes with Kate Botello. Coming up: love, musical theatre style, from First Date to Fond Memory! At Intermission, a few lesser-known takes on Romeo and Juliet that might be new to you. In Act Two: famous Valentines of the theatrical variety.

Click through for this week's playlist and a rare movie clip of Broadway legends Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne.


Updated at 3 p.m. ET

Al Jarreau, a versatile vocalist who defied categorization for decades, died Sunday morning at the age of 76. Earlier this week, Jarreau had been hospitalized in Los Angeles "due to exhaustion," according to his official Facebook page.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thanks to listeners from Cedar, St. Ignace, Farmington Hills, Crystal Lake, Honor, and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Ralph Vaughan Williams, Symphony No. 7 (Sinfonia Antarctica), first movement; Bernard Haitink/London Philharmonic/Sheila Armstrong

2. Casalina & Ferro, Non ti scordar di me; Mario Lanza

3. P.I. Tchaikovsky, Nutcracker: Overture and Waltz of the Flowers; Fritz Reiner/Chicago Symphony Orchestra

4. Craig Hella Johnson, Considering Matthew Shepard; Craig Hella Johnson/Conspirare

The music industry can thank Glenn Miller's record label for the idea of gold records. Seventy-five years ago today, his song about a train trip became the world's first solid-gold hit.

"Chattanooga Choo Choo" is about a man going home, and promising his sweetheart he'll never roam. By February 10, 1942, more than 1.2 million copies of the song had been sold — and that was no small thing, the biggest seller in years. The record label, RCA Victor, celebrated by presenting Glenn Miller with a trophy during a live radio broadcast.

Among the nominees up for Grammy Awards on Sunday is a surround-sound album created by a composer who was an online student at Boston’s Berklee College of Music.

Craig Hella Johnson’s composition is titled “Considering Matthew Shepard.” Shepard was the gay college student beaten and abandoned in a Wyoming field in 1998. He died six days later.

The Fred Hersch Trio brings a seductive and crafty intelligence to its version of "We See," the Thelonious Monk tune. Articulating its melody at the piano, Hersch slips in a few leisurely pauses, which slow down and stretch out the form. Then, in the bridge, he ratchets up to twice the speed, evoking the frenetic whir of the factory machinery in Charlie Chaplin's Modern Times.

This Saturday, February 11, the Interlochen Arts Academy Band and the Creative Writing Department are collaborating in a unique exploration of the intersection between sounds, words and meaning.

"The greatest stories ask the biggest questions," budding animation artist Alex Sopp replied when I asked about the video she's created for "Sunset Boulevard," a song from First, the upcoming album by the new music sextet yMusic.

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