boating

A proposed high-speed boat race in Traverse City is dead in the water. The city commission rejected plans for the “Grand Traverse Bay Offshore Classic” last night.

Commissioners said they were concerned about noise, possible environmental damage and congestion at the city marina. They said they had heard mostly negative input from the community.

Commissioner Tim Werner said the city may only have room for two big events – the National Cherry Festival and the Traverse City Film Festival.

Fans of high-speed boat racing want to hold a three-day race on Grand Traverse Bay next year. Organizers say the “Grand Traverse Bay Offshore Classic” could draw 100,000 spectators - and $10 million - to Traverse City.

West Grand Traverse Bay could host a high-speed boat race next summer. Organizers with the American Power Boat Association and the Offshore Powerboat Association want to hold the “Grand Traverse Bay Offshore Classic” in Traverse City for three days in August 2018.

Amanda Holmes

Small harbors in Michigan have a big problem. Over time, access to harbors gets blocked by sand and sediment, and the harbor needs to be dredged. But the money to pay for dredging just isn’t there anymore.

Aaron Selbig

A district court judge has thrown out extortion charges against a Traverse City resort owner. Judge Thomas Phillips says the Michigan Attorney General’s Office failed to make its case that 58-year-old Bryan Punturo committed a crime.

State prosecutors alleged Punturo, owner of the ParkShore Resort on East Grand Traverse Bay, threatened the owner of a competing parasailing business. Puntoro allegedly convinced the victim, Saburi Boyer, to pay him $19,000 a year in exchange for not forcing him out of business.

Washing away invasive hitchhikers

Aug 18, 2015

Invasive species love to sneak a ride on boats.

There are more than 180 exotic species in the Great Lakes, and we help move them around.

Jo Latimore is an outreach specialist with the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University.

“Research has shown that boats and trailers moving from one lake to another are the number one vector, the number one pathway of invasive species moving from one water body to the next,” she says.