Morning Classical

Monday - Friday, 7am to 10am on Classical IPR

Join Kate Botello on Classical IPR weekday mornings from 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Tune in for a wide variety of classical music with an occasionally eclectic bent - you might catch a show tune or a jazz standard here and there!

Kate also blogs about the birthdays of famous composers, offbeat facts in Classical music and other points of interest.  She hosts musical guests, interviews, and regularly invites expert community members to join her on-air to share their knowledge and love of music.

Kate's Morning Classical program has some regular features during the week, including -

Monday - Friday, 7:40 a.m. - The Kids' Commute

Tune in for classical music aimed to educate and entertain the younglings, trapped in the car on the way to school. Find out more about The Kids' Commute!

Wednesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Long Play Wednesday

Luxuriate in a full symphony or a nice, long concerto to help you get through Hump Day.

Friday mornings before 10:00 a.m. - Friday Dance Party!

Kickstart your weekend with the last piece of music that Kate plays on Friday mornings - dance tunes by way of the Renaissance, symphonic dances, or folk dance suites.

Judy Rumelhart, Associate Producer of the original Broadway run of Sondheim's, SWEENEY TODD.
Interlochen Center for the Arts

Interlochen Arts Academy's production of SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET opens this weekend.

Judy Rumelhart, an Associate Producer of the Sondheim classic's original Broadway run, will be watching the production with great love. Judy joined IPR's Kate Botello in the studio to discuss her memories of the first SWEENEY TODD - and selected a few of her favorites to share with us!

Judy selected the following pieces: 

  • Prologue/The Ballad of Sweeney Todd
  • The Worst Pies in London
  • Pretty Women
  • Not While I'm Around


The Cummings Quartet (L-R): Liz Bert, Kim Teachout, Cheryl Zetterholm and David Reimer
gerberstrings.org

The Cummings String Quartet performed in IPR's Studio A. 

Violinists David Reimer and Cheryl Zetterholm, along with violist Kim Teachout and cellist Liz Bert played two movements of a Beethoven work and chatted with IPR's Kate Botello about their quartet and their work with the Dorothy Gerber Strings Program in conjunction with Charlevoix Circle of Arts.

On Sunday, May 6 at 4pm, the Cummings Quartet will perform at Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Petoskey as part of the Great Lakes Chamber Orchestra Sunday Recital Series.


Artist Diane Hawkey created "Peaceable Kingdom: A Global History of Man" for Michigan Artists Gallery in Traverse City. The piece is based off Edward Hick's paintings and is displayed at Michigan Artists Gallery.
Dan Wanschura

In the early 1800’s, American painter Edward Hicks began painting “Peaceable Kingdom," a series of 62 paintings inspired by a verse in the book of Isaiah.

The verse says, “The wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the young goat, and the calf and the lion and the fattened calf together; and a little child shall lead them.” 

In Traverse City, two different art galleries are bringing that concept to the art world.

 

Karen Anderson has been writing weekly essays for IPR for 10 years. Her new book, "Gradual Clearing" is a collection of 120 of those essays.
Windborne Studios

For the last 10 years, Karen Anderson has been writing weekly essays heard on Interlochen Public Radio.

The essays are vivid, personal, and relatable. Karen takes time to notice the little details and experiences of everyday life.


Joe Beyer (right) and Michael Moore in the Traverse City Film Festival offices in downtown Traverse City.
Dan Wanschura

Michael Moore has hired Joe Beyer as the new executive director for his Traverse City Film Festival. Joe replaces Deb Lake, who resigned last December.

“It’s like we found our long-lost soul brother here for Traverse City in the being of Joe Beyer,” says Michael.

Joe Beyer returns home to Michigan after working for the Sundance Institute for over 14 years.

Chris Andrews walked across the country pushing this cart in an effort to spark face to face conversations.
Chris Andrews

A couple years ago, Chris Andrews, a senior at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, realized he was addicted to his smartphone.

“It was something I was using as a crutch,” he explains. “Something that I was using in moments of boredom, moments of anxiety, or a moment of silence in a group of friends – we’d all reach for our phones.”


Eighth Blackbird percussionist Matthew Duvall performed excerpts from John Cage's In a Landscape and Steve Reich's Clapping in Studio A at Classical IPR.

Duvall talked with IPR's Kate Botello about the significance of Reich's work, his influences, and how Reich affects what Duvall calls, "rhythmic perception."

Eighth Blackbird will perform the works of Steve Reich (Sextet and Music for 18 Musicians) with Third Coast Percussion in Corson auditorium tonight at 7:30 p.m. For more details, visit tickets.interlochen.org


Jason Dake, the education curator at the Dennos Museum points out some art during a recent walk-through of the museum.
Dan Wanschura

The Dennos Museum in Traverse City has almost three-thousand works of art in its collection.

At any given time, around 280 of those works are on display, including Inuit sculptures, contemporary paintings and modern photographs.

But on April 14th, the museum wants visitors to ignore most of these works and just focus on a handful of them.  


Author Jack Hobey has written about Edward Beebe, a photographer who would often lie about the location of his photos.
Matt Mikus

Edward Beebe was a popular photographer in northern Michigan in the early 1900s. He created postcards with his photos but often deceived people regarding the location of the shots.

“I think a lot of these cards were intended to take advantage of tourists and visitors,” says local author Jack Hobey.

The Boardman Review captures what it's like to live in northern Michigan year-round.
Dan Wanschura

The Boardman Review is a quarterly publication founded by brothers Nick and Chris Loud. 

They recently published their third issue, a winter edition.

 


Anders Kelto (right) stands next to Anthony Ervin, a swimmer who is featured in Kelto's new audio series "Gamebreaker with Keith Olbermann."
Caroline Kim

When Anders Kelto listened to sports podcasts, what he usually heard was a couple of guys sitting around bantering with each other.

“There was no good audio sports journalism in the world, at least that I had been exposed to,” he says.

Anders is changing that. Today, the Traverse City native is out with his own podcast —it’s a sports documentary series.

 


Cast members for Parallel 45 Theatre's production of "Go, Dog. Go!" rehearse in Traverse City Wednesday night.
Dan Wanschura

Parallel 45 Theatre is about to try something new.

The professional theatre company started in Traverse City seven years ago and typically produces three to four shows throughout the year.

Next year, the company wants to produce more shows, for more people. 

Jeremy Reisig, aka brotha James, is coming out with his second album in April.
brothajames.com

Jeremy Reisig, better known as brotha James, is a one-man band from Elk Rapids.

He’ll do all sorts of things — beatbox, play the guitar, rap, sing — sometimes all in the same song. He’s able to do all that because he often loops his own music tracks.

 


Michael Cleveland, blind from birth, is one of the most accomplished fiddlers in bluegrass music.
www.flamekeeperband.com

Michael Cleveland has been called “one of the premier fiddle players of his generation, if not in all of bluegrass history.”

He's also been completely blind since birth.

 


The 1968 Mustang Fastback used in the film "Bullitt" is on display at the Hagerty Insurance building in Traverse City.
Dan Wanschura

The Ford Mustang from the 1968 film “Bullitt” is currently on display at the Hagerty Insurance in Traverse City.


Interlochen Arts Academy Band Director Matthew Schlomer leads students in a recent dress rehearsal.
Interlochen Center for the Arts

When "The Soldier's Tale" premiered in 1918, an influenza epidemic cut short it's European performance tour.

Ironically, the flu caused some problems for Interlochen Arts Academy students as they practiced for the show earlier this year.


Caroline MacGregor

A well-known horse whisperer has passed away in northern Michigan. Alex MacLellan was the owner of H&H Stables in Leelanau County.


Luis Resto brings his Detroit-based band to northern Michigan this weekend.
Dan Wanschura

Songwriter and producer Luis Resto says other music scenes are more polished than Detroit, but that’s one reason why the Motor City is so special to him.  

“Detroit has this street grit, what we call ‘stank,’” he says. “Which is good.”


Traverse City author Doug Stanton wrote 'Horse Soliders,' which is the basis for the new film '12 Strong.' The film opens in theaters nationwide January 19.
Dan Wanschura

Next week, the movie based on Doug Stanton’s book ‘Horse Soldiers’ will hit theaters nationwide. It’s about a small group of Special Forces who rode horses to fight the Taliban.

“It’s a Western with lasers,” says Doug.

Pines of Arcadia is a new artist residency near Manistee.
Dan Wanschura

Pines of Arcadia. That’s the name of a new artist residency and studio north of Manistee. The studio is built into a sand dune and surrounded by pine trees.

Judy Jashinsky is the owner and came with the idea to start the residency.

Paul Britten designed the new player entry tunnel for the Denver Broncos.
Denver Broncos

It’s gameday in Denver.

Before the Broncos start playing football, players are announced as they sprint onto the field through a smoke-filled tunnel shaped like three wild, galloping horses.


Karen Anderson has been writing weekly essays for IPR for 10 years. Her new book, "Gradual Clearing" is a collection of 120 of those essays.
Windborne Studios

For the last 10 years, Karen Anderson has been writing weekly essays heard on Interlochen Public Radio.

The essays are vivid, personal, and relatable. Karen takes time to notice the little details and experiences of everyday life.

Rufus Snoddy says being apart of Art Miami is one of the biggest opportunities in his career.
Dan Wanschura

Next week, Traverse City artist Rufus Snoddy goes to the Super Bowl of the modern art world.

“This is one of the best opportunities I’ve had in my life,” he says.

Rufus is a part of Miami Art Week. It brings galleries and high-end collectors from all over the world to south Florida.

Rebecca Reynolds and Jim Carpenter recently released their second podcast series about Charles Manson, called "Young Charlie." They say despite the brutal details of the murders covered in the show, it's a story that needs to be told.
Dan Wanschura

Take a look at a list of top podcasts today and one thing is very clear: murder is big.

Podcasts like “Dirty John,” “Someone Knows Something,” and a show from ABC News called “A Killing on the Cape,” often focus on the graphic details of murder. Currently, they rank higher on iTunes than shows like “Fresh Air,” “Radiolab” and “The Ted Radio Hour.”

"Birds Eye View - Leland, Mich." reads the caption from one of Edward Beebe's photo postcards.
Matt Mikus

Edward Beebe was a popular photographer in northern Michigan in the early 1900s. He created postcards with his photos but often deceived people regarding the location of the shots.

“I think a lot of these cards were intended to take advantage of tourists and visitors,” says local author Jack Hobey.


Pages