Morning Classical

Monday - Friday, 7am to 10am on Classical IPR

Join Kate Botello on Classical IPR weekday mornings from 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Tune in for a wide variety of classical music with an occasionally eclectic bent - you might catch a show tune or a jazz standard here and there!

Kate also blogs about the birthdays of famous composers, offbeat facts in Classical music and other points of interest.  She hosts musical guests, interviews, and regularly invites expert community members to join her on-air to share their knowledge and love of music.

Kate's Morning Classical program has some regular features during the week, including -

Monday - Friday, 7:40 a.m. - The Kids' Commute

Tune in for classical music aimed to educate and entertain the younglings, trapped in the car on the way to school. Find out more about The Kids' Commute!

Tuesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Short Suites

Each Tuesday, Kate plays a "Short Suite" - two pieces of music that go together, in one way or the other.  Submit your own idea or learn more about Short Suites.

Wednesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Long Play Wednesday

Luxuriate in a full symphony or a nice, long concerto to help you get through Hump Day.

Friday mornings before 10:00 a.m. - Friday Dance Party!

Kickstart your weekend with the last piece of music that Kate plays on Friday mornings - dance tunes by way of the Renaissance, symphonic dances, or folk dance suites.

The 2016 Traverse City Film Festival will celebrate the State Theatre's Centennial among other things.
Daniel Wanschura

The 12th Annual Traverse City Film Festival gets underway next Tuesday.

This year, the 32 officially selected films are all directed by women. Meg Weichman is the Creative Director for the film festival. She says it was founder Michael Moore who had the idea making all the official selections, films that were directed by women. 

"We did try to look for more films by female filmmakers this year, and we were shooting for maybe just having fifty percent," explains Weichman. She says what they found was staggering. "Michael loved so many great movies by women, he wanted to make all of our official selections in competition just directed by women."


Jennifer Blakeslee and Eric Patterson are sharing their knowledge with younger chefs in Traverse City.
Tracy Grant (KarunaPhoto)

Eric Patterson wakes up around 7 a.m. He pulls his hair back into a bun, puts on a beige suit and heads out the door. He is the owner of Cooks’ House in Traverse City, a well-known farm-to-table restaurant. 

Previously, he worked as a chef at three Michelin-starred restaurants. He was head chef at Andre’s, a famous restaurant in Las Vegas, where he relished the thrill of finding the ingredients, preparing dishes and working for hours behind the stove. The stress of the job kept him going for years.  


Interlochen Center for the Arts

After dedicating 40 years to Interlochen, David Holland decided to compile a treasury of performances by the String Orchestra, an ensemble he founded and directed from 1973-2013.  

Listen to the interview, including a performance of Vaughan William's Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, here: 

For more information click here

From left: Richard (Kyle Carter) Vickie (Macie Goodspeed) Janet (Madi Shank)
Joann Muma

Friday is the opening night of The Manistee Civic Players’ stage rendition of 1970s hit television show Free to Be… You and Me. Kate Botello sat down to talk with the director of the production, Connar Klock. He lives in Kalamazoo, but he’s originally from the Manistee area and was asked to come back to direct this show about gender neutrality and social constructs. Behind the bouncy and upbeat music, Free to Be… You and Me addresses serious themes that are still relevant today. 

 


Peggy McNew gets up close and personal with her watercolor painting. She has cone dystrophy, and uses her lower peripheral vision to see.
Dan Wanschura

Peggy McNew is a painter from Empire, Michigan. There’s nothing unusual about that— there are a lot of painters in Leelanau County. But Peggy is different. She’s legally blind. 

And a question that she’s wrestled with is whether or not that matters in relation to her art.

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