Morning Classical

Monday - Friday, 7am to 10am on Classical IPR

Join Kate Botello on Classical IPR weekday mornings from 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Tune in for a wide variety of classical music with an occasionally eclectic bent - you might catch a show tune or a jazz standard here and there!

Kate also blogs about the birthdays of famous composers, offbeat facts in Classical music and other points of interest.  She hosts musical guests, interviews, and regularly invites expert community members to join her on-air to share their knowledge and love of music.

Kate's Morning Classical program has some regular features during the week, including -

Monday - Friday, 7:40 a.m. - The Kids' Commute

Tune in for classical music aimed to educate and entertain the younglings, trapped in the car on the way to school. Find out more about The Kids' Commute!

Tuesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Short Suites

Each Tuesday, Kate plays a "Short Suite" - two pieces of music that go together, in one way or the other.  Submit your own idea or learn more about Short Suites.

Wednesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Long Play Wednesday

Luxuriate in a full symphony or a nice, long concerto to help you get through Hump Day.

Friday mornings before 10:00 a.m. - Friday Dance Party!

Kickstart your weekend with the last piece of music that Kate plays on Friday mornings - dance tunes by way of the Renaissance, symphonic dances, or folk dance suites.

Dave Miles, a curator at the Charlevoix Historical Society, stands by a new fishing industry display. It's part of a new exhibit focusing on the history of business and industry in Charlevoix.
Dan Wanschura

When Neil Armstrong first stepped on the moon in 1969, a little bit of Charlevoix was with him. 

Charlevoix made it to the moon in the form of a very tiny, lightweight chrome and nickel thread. The thread was manufactured by a Charlevoix company named Hoskins, and was used in the Apollo Space Program space suits.

That's the kind of historical link that might not be well known, but something that a new exhibit at the Charlevoix Historical Society seeks to make known.

John Larson is the owner of one of Traverse City's newest restaurants, Mama Lu's.
Dan Wanschura

When chef John Larson and his family moved from Chicago to Traverse City last spring, he soon realized that getting a table at a downtown restaurant was a bit difficult at times.

"There weren't enough restaurants," says Larson. "I noticed every single place was on a two-hour wait during the summer months."

That was good news for the entrepreneur from Chicago. 

Just over a year later, Mama Lu's is now open for business just in time for the busy summer months in Traverse City.

Poet Mike Delp addresses a men's gathering in Cedar, Michigan. He recently authored a new collection of poetry called, 'Lying in the River's Dark Bed.'
Dan Wanschura

On a recent Saturday evening in Cedar, Michigan, about 40 guys are gathered in the home of Jeff Smith, the editor of Traverse magazine. The night is centered around beer and poetry. The beverage of choice is from the recently opened Lake Ann Brewing Company. The poet is Mike Delp.

Mike Delp has a new book titled Lying in the River’s Dark Bed. It’s what he calls the confluence of the Deadman and the Mad Angler— characters he’s has been crafting for years.  

 

Interlochen Arts Academy

On June 5, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra and Dance Company will perform at David Geffen Hall in NYC as part of the NY Phil Biennial. Christopher Rountree is a young American conductor and composer committed to bringing contemporary music to a broader audience.  He will be conducting the Orchestra for the Biennial in June and has visited campus a number of times to work with the students in preparation for the performance.


Mary Sue Wilkinson leads a sing-along session at Orchard Creek Supportive Care in Traverse City. Residents who suffer from dementia are still able to connect with the music from years before.
Dan Wanschura


Mary Sue Wilkinson remembers how sad she felt when she used to visit her father-in-law who was suffering from dementia. He was a former minister, but near the end of his life he couldn’t talk. 

Whether out of desperation or instinct, Mary Sue took her guitar and started to sing the old Gospel hymn, I’ll Fly Away. He made eye contact and began to sing along. 

"He sang every word in perfect harmony; perfect pitch," says Mary Sue. "He was so happy you could just see that he was experiencing the competence of that.” 

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