Morning Classical

Monday - Friday, 7am to 10am on Classical IPR

Join Kate Botello on Classical IPR weekday mornings from 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Tune in for a wide variety of classical music with an occasionally eclectic bent - you might catch a show tune or a jazz standard here and there!

Kate also blogs about the birthdays of famous composers, offbeat facts in Classical music and other points of interest.  She hosts musical guests, interviews, and regularly invites expert community members to join her on-air to share their knowledge and love of music.

Kate's Morning Classical program has some regular features during the week, including -

Monday - Friday, 7:40 a.m. - The Kids' Commute

Tune in for classical music aimed to educate and entertain the younglings, trapped in the car on the way to school. Find out more about The Kids' Commute!

Tuesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Short Suites

Each Tuesday, Kate plays a "Short Suite" - two pieces of music that go together, in one way or the other.  Submit your own idea or learn more about Short Suites.

Wednesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Long Play Wednesday

Luxuriate in a full symphony or a nice, long concerto to help you get through Hump Day.

Friday mornings before 10:00 a.m. - Friday Dance Party!

Kickstart your weekend with the last piece of music that Kate plays on Friday mornings - dance tunes by way of the Renaissance, symphonic dances, or folk dance suites.

Capturing Mother Nature in action: This week on The Green Room

Nov 19, 2015
Todd and Brad Reed Photography

Sara Kassien is not a photographer. She was in the right place though on Sunday, August 2nd, driving home from work when the storm that had wrecked Glen Arbor swept over Traverse City.

“I saw all these other people pulled over,” she remembers. “I’m like, ‘That’s a good idea, I should do that.’ I followed the crowd.”

Illustrated for Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper in 1860

On the 40th anniversary of the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald, we got to thinking about how much the media has covered this particular event. With 8,000 known wrecks on the Great Lakes alone, why would this wreck be so popular? And why does it seem like our collective knowledge of maritime history starts and ends with the Edmund Fitzgerald? 

The best explanation seems to be Gordon Lightfoot and his chart-topping song “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.” 


Ruby John performs in many fiddle styles, including Métis.
Aaron Selbig

America has long been thought of as a melting pot; a place where people from different backgrounds come together and in so doing, create new and unique cultures. As the fur trade in the upper Great Lakes region blossomed in the late 1600’s, French voyageurs and trappers began to marry Native American women. People with this mix of native and European heritage became known as Métis. 

Métis is a French word that roughly translated means “mixed blood” or “of mixed descent.”

Welcome to Episode Four of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! Coming up this week: CATS in far-flung places, a bit of The Bard, and we throw some love to the intrepid Broadway chorus. Tune in to Classical IPR Sunday night at 7pm or listen anytime right here.

Click through to see this week's playlist and find out how you can hear your voice on the show!

Aaron Selbig

Meet Travis Duncan, manager of the Swamp of Suffering. That's the main attraction at Screams In the Dark, a big haunted house set up on the county fairgrounds near Traverse City.

Duncan plays a zombie that’s dressed as a member of a SWAT team. He and his small army of volunteers see themselves as something resembling a theatre troupe.

“This whole idea is to set up an illusion that you’re actually in a swamp," says Duncan. "You’re in a mausoleum, you’re in a graveyard. So we try to keep people in character so they can give that illusion and keep that illusion up.”