Stateside Staff

Is there hope for a new life after being addicted to drugs or selling drugs?

Detroiter Sheldon Hill is proof there is.

After years of selling and using drugs, and multiple arrests, Hill went into an addiction recovery program. He was in his 40s. And it worked.

Today, Hill's sole mission in life is to keep others from making the mistakes and choices he made as a young man.

Michigan’s strong history in the defense sector dates back to Rosie the Riveter in World War II.

The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) reports the defense sector supports 105,000 jobs in our state, turning out $9 billion in goods and services.

Michigan wants to continue that tradition by landing the new F-35 fighter jet.

Stateside 7.11.2017

Jul 11, 2017

Today, we hear why the state's largest hospital system would prefer to repair the Affordable Care Act, not start from scratch. And, we learn why the Selfridge Air National Guard Base aims to become a home for the new F-35 fighter jet.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

The Next Idea

Parents of children on the autism spectrum face significant challenges in getting the right education, support and other life tools for their kids. But the difficulties don’t go away when these kids grow up. Can they live alone, support themselves, be a part of society? And what happens when their adult caregivers age out of watching over them?

Most of us expect to hear that trees are moving north in search of colder temperatures because of global climate change. But trees don’t only need colder temperatures; they also need to have enough water.

A new study published in Science Advances suggests that trees are moving west in search of more moisture.

Associate Professor School for Environment and Sustainability Inés Ibáñez joined us on Stateside to share her perspective on the many other global change factors that are causing this migration.

Anan Ameri has made her mark here in Michigan.  She is the founder of the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn, an inductee into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame, and she is the founder of the Palestine Aid Society of America.

Now, Ameri is making a new mark as an author. Her new memoir is titled, The Scent of Jasmine: Coming of Age in Jerusalem and Damascus and she joined Stateside to talk about her upbringing. 

There's a big new discovery in the world of astronomy.

And "big" is appropriate: it's a giant planet much like Jupiter, revolving around a star about 385 light years from the sun.

“We think we have an estimate of its temperature, somewhere around 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. So it’s very toasty on this planet,” said Michael Meyer, a University of Michigan professor of astronomy who is part of the team that discovered this planet.

Stateside 7.10.2017

Jul 10, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why some alleged victims are furious over former doctor Larry Nassar's plea deal. We also hear why one political consultant thinks the Democratic Party's messaging is still failing to convince voters. And, we learn why Michigan trees are migrating. (Note: It's not all due to climate change).

Stateside 7.7.2017

Jul 7, 2017

  

Today on Stateside, the Genesee County treasurer won't foreclose on homes with unpaid water bills because the "water was poison." And, we hear how treatment and understanding of PTSD are evolving. 

Stateside 7.6.2017

Jul 6, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Wayne County may have a national model for prosecuting crimes against the LGBTQ community. And, we learn about a bipartisan effort to take redistricting out of politicians' hands.

It is an interesting, and also tough, time to be both black and Muslim in Michigan.

Anti-Muslim rhetoric in politics and media seems to be intensifying, and there are daily reminders of our nation's long, painful – and still unresolved – history of race relations. 

Dr. Halim Naeem​, a psychologist based in Livonia, and Tahira Khalid, head counselor at Muslim Family Services in Detroit, joined Stateside to share their perspectives on what it means to be both black and Muslim in Michigan.

When you hear the words "ghost town," you might imagine a dusty, vacant place in the Old West, where cowboys once tread.

Well, think again because Michigan has its share of ghost towns, too. 

Mark Harvey from the Michigan History Center joined Stateside to talk about one of them: Singapore, Michigan. 

Summer has been full of music festivals in Michigan, many of them showcasing regional and local Michigan artists.

Local Spins Editor and Publisher John Sinkevics told Stateside about groups in West Michigan. He explored an indie rock group’s new EP, a jazz organ trio’s Beatles cover songs, and Jim Shaneberger’s blues rock band.

The U.S. Coast Guard has a message for us: knock it off with the prank calls. 

The Coast Guard is seeing a big jump in phony distress calls: more than 160 made across the Great Lakes so far this year.

The plan to link four Southeast Michigan counties with one regional transit system failed at the ballot box last November. It was rejected by some by 18,000 votes.

That has the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan thinking of ways to make the plan more appealing to more voters.

Stateside 7.5.2017

Jul 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, we explore what it means to be black and Muslim in Michigan. We also hear new music from groups in West Michigan, and we learn about the ghost town often called "Michigan's Pompeii."

Stateside 7.3.2017

Jul 3, 2017

Today, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team breaks down the latest in state politics, including Secretary of State Ruth Johnson's announcement that Michigan will largely comply with the Trump administration's request for very specific voter data. And, we hear how success started with failure in school for a child of proud Haitian parents. He's now head of design for Fiat Chrysler.

Stateside 6.30.2017

Jun 30, 2017

Today on Stateside, we rebroadcast some of our best Friday stories, and we hear about the blight and illegal dumping happening in some Detroit neighborhoods.

Fans of NPR’s  This American Life are on high alert here in southeast Michigan.

Host Ira Glass is coming to the Ann Arbor Summer Festival this Saturday night. He’ll be at the Power Center for a show called Seven Things I’ve Learnedand he joined Stateside today to talk about it.

Controversy and protest erupted in the small Northern Michigan village of Kalkaska last week, centering on anti-Muslim Facebook posts written and shared by village President Jeff Sieting.

Last Friday, about 100 protestors gathered to demand Sieting's resignation.

The political and legal drama continues to swirl around the beleaguered people of Flint.

The latest twist?

The state is suing the city of Flint for not approving a plan to get its drinking water from Detroit’s Great Lakes Water Authority.

A Grand Rapids non-profit group is hoping to boost the inventory of affordable housing in West and Mid-Michigan.

The Inner City Christian Federation is working to secure 177 houses in the Grand Rapids and Lansing areas.

CEO Ryan VerWys said the price of homes in Grand Rapids is going up “way faster” than people’s income.

Stateside 6.29.2017

Jun 29, 2017

Today, the state sues the city of Flint to force it to accept its own mayor's plan to stay with water from Detroit. Then, the village president of Kalkaska is not backing down from his controversial anti-Muslim Facebook posts. We talk with him and a critic from the group Redneck Revolt.

Environmental programs all across Michigan are in danger from budget cuts – not just the spending cuts in President Trump’s budget proposal, but state funding cuts as well.

It’s a one-two punch that has environmental groups very worried.

Stories like that of Nicole Beverly, whose abusive husband is set to be released from prison in August despite alleged threats to kill her and her children, are nothing new for Barbara Niess-May, executive director of SafeHouse Center in Ann Arbor.

“Her story is common, in that there are many survivors who find themselves needing to relocate because of the assailant,” Niess-May said. “What’s uncommon is the fact that she has gone public with her story.”

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