Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, we hear what you need to know as of now about the boil water advisory issued for parts of Oakland County. And, we learn how a Michigan law has found homes for 200 unwanted newborns. 

The Next Idea

“There ought to be a law.” It’s easier said than done.

The truth is that making policy is an incredibly complex process. For each bill there are multiple stakeholders, and they all demand different things from the outcome.

Teachers can illustrate that complexity for their students through role-playing simulations around policymaking, but even simulations can be too much for one instructor to organize.

The Next Idea

“There ought to be a law.” It’s easier said than done.

The truth is that making policy is an incredibly complex process. For each bill there are multiple stakeholders, and they all demand different things from the outcome.

Teachers can illustrate that complexity for their students through role-playing simulations around policymaking, but even simulations can be too much for one instructor to organize.

One way to learn history is through textbooks and lectures. Another is through the words and handwriting of the people from our past. That’s right: letters, something today’s college students don’t see too much of.

Students at Grand Valley State University are getting a chance to experience the emotional and historical power of letters through a podcast called To the Letter.

Is ketchup a vegetable again? Today on Stateside, the "Rebel Lunch Lady" discusses politics and health of school lunches. And, we learn about the bill that would give charter schools a cut of millage revenue.

On the program today we'll talk about #MeToo. Plus, May Erlewine talks about songs on her latest album. And, we’ll hear about underserved farmers fighting the government.

Today on Stateside, we sit down with three teachers to learn what it's really like to be a new educator in Michigan. The author of a new book explains why teams that lack diversity do worse when it comes to solving big business problems. Also today, we hear what's in the state's new "plain English" draft fixes to the "dumb and dangerous" lead rule.

Last year was a record year for Michigan lottery money going to schools.

Jeff Holyfield, director of public relations at the Michigan Lottery, joined Stateside to discuss the Michigan Lottery’s financial involvement in the state, and what's up with repeat winners.

The Detroit Public Schools Community District (DPSCD) has been through its first count day of the school year. It’s an important day, because the number of kids in attendance helps determine the amount of money the district receives from the state.

Nikolai Vitti, DPSCD’s new superintendent, joined Stateside to report how the day went in Detroit and to explain what the district is doing amidst teacher shortages and other challenges.

 


Nobody ever thought they would find it: the P-39 fighter plane that Tuskegee Airman Frank Herman Moody, originally of Oklahoma, was flying over Lake Huron when he crashed.


But then, as luck or fate would have it, there was a bad storm on Lake Huron in April of that year, a barge and tug went down, and a cleanup was scheduled.


It was during this cleanup that a set of almost perfectly intact wings were found on the lake's floor.

Legislation to restrict the authority of state departments has passed the Michigan House and is making its way through the Senate.

House Bill 4205 would not let agency rules be any stricter than federal rules without proof that it’s necessary. 

Environmental groups are concerned. As the Great Lakes state, past legislatures have embraced a role of being a guardian of the lakes. Stricter agency rules were seen as part of the state being a good steward and an example for other states.

Today on Stateside, a representative from the Michigan Lottery talks school aid, transparency, and what's up with the repeat winners. Also today, despite the teacher shortage, the Detroit schools superintendent says the district is building momentum. And, new legislation aims to curb state agency power, but at what cost?

Today on Stateside, a new committee opposing a ballot initiative on gerrymandering may hint at a partisan fight ahead, and the former EPA administrator defends Obama-era fuel efficiency standards, saying they're good for health.

Health officials in Kent County plan to investigate whether there are cancer clusters near waste dump sites once used by  the shoemaker Wolverine World Wide tannery in Rockford.

Brian Hartl, an epidemiologist with the Kent County Health Department, joined Stateside today to explain what the department knows now, and how it plans to move forward.

Jeff Daniels says he was originally going to write a comedy when he sat down to work on his newest play Flint.

But then Trump happened. And Charlottesville. 

So Daniels started to think about the precursors that might explain what made those things possible.

People in Grass Lake, in Jackson County, are arguing about their school district’s decision to allow a transgender boy in elementary school to use the boys’ restroom.

The district has plans to build privacy stalls around urinals in school buildings.

Supporters and opponents of the policy, including people who don’t live in Grass Lake, have been showing up at school board meetings even when the issue isn’t on the agenda. 

Today on Stateside, we hear how Kent County is looking for cancer clusters near Wolverine tannery dump sites. And, Jeff Daniels talks about Flint, his upcoming play about race and poisoned water. The Grass Lake schools superintendent also explains why the district chose to let a transgender student use the boys' bathroom. 

People are dying in Macomb County's overcrowded jail. Today on Stateside, we learn what role the courts play in those deaths.

Also today, a former police chief says private police bills would bring "mercenary policing" to Michigan communities. And, climate activist Bill McKibben says we've made "nowhere near enough" progress in combating climate change. Finally, we cheers to the weekend with a fall drink of Ann Arbor-made whiskey.

Eighteen people have died in the Macomb County Jail since 2012. Today on Stateside, we hear one woman's story. Also today, we learn how Michigan's gun control movement lost big 16 years ago, and why Michiganders should thank "TV money" for the late MSU-UM kickoff this weekend.

File a FOIA request, get sued.

A journalist, taxpayer, or government watchdog group can use the Freedom of Information Act to request records from a public body — maybe a government agency or state university, for instance.

The response? The public body sues the requester.

It’s happening in Michigan and spreading through the country. But what does this mean for a free press and transparency of public information?

Today (10/4)  is Count Day. For school districts in Michigan, it’s crucially important to have as many enrolled kids sitting in their seats as possible. That’s because this is one of the two days during the school year when attendance determines how much state aid schools will get.

There’s much work to do in boosting attendance, not just on Count Day.  A recent report from Johns Hopkins University finds Michigan's chronic student absence rate of 18-percent is well above the national average of 13-percent.

You might have heard the phrase, “A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle.” But did you know that in the 1880s, leaders in Michigan decided that fish needed a train?

Congress is investigating ways Russia tried to meddle in the 2016 election, especially through social media.

The Senate Intelligence Committee has asked Facebook, Google, and Twitter to testify at a hearing on Nov. 1. The House Intelligence Committee will do the same sometime this month.

Now, an exclusive report from CNN puts Michigan at the center of this investigation – with Russian trolls and Facebook ads.

There's a new tactic that public universities, government offices, and other public entities in Michigan are using to avoid providing information to taxpayers and journalists -- who have a legal right to know what's going on. Today on Stateside, we'll learn more from a First Amendment attorney. Also, fish may not need bicycles, but at one point in Michigan history, they needed a train.  

What should you do if you think your Equifax account was breached? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, in the wake of Hurricane Maria, we hear how Michigan's Puerto Rican community is mobilizing for those in need.

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