Stateside Staff

Imagine being a little kid, driving home late at night with your dad.

You drop off to sleep, more or less, but you're awake enough to feel your dad scoop you up, carry you into the house, and gently tuck you into bed.

Now imagine that dad is NHL legend Gordie Howe, and he's tucking you in just a short time after he thrilled thousands of Detroit Red Wings fans cheering for Mr. Hockey at Olympia Stadium.

You have probably heard the phrase “school of choice” used when describing public education options in Michigan, but what about a “school of no choice?” That was the case for many native Michiganders for over a century.

Today on Stateside, Gordie Howe's son recalls growing up with Mr. Hockey. Also today, we contextualize some election results and learn how a Harbor Springs boarding school worked to erase Odawa culture until the 1980s. 

Today on Stateside, we learn who is responsible for what roads in Michigan. We also hear how auto insurance costs can vary wildly depending on which side of the street you live. And, we talk to the filmmaker of a new documentary that chronicles the highs and lows of Detroit rapper Danny Brown.

Come next January, Lansing's going to have itself a new mayor for the first time in a dozen years. Today on Stateside, outgoing mayor Virg Bernero reflects on his legacy. Also today, from mailers and commercials to donations, we hear why tracking all of the money in local elections is not easy. And, can soul food be vegan? We learn why Detroit restaurateurs say yes as they serve up meatless favorites.

Today on Stateside, we discuss Amazon's next potential disruption: auto dealerships. We also hear how Detroit's lopsided mayor's race still reveals divisions. And, we discuss the bill that'd scrap state ballast water rules – the ones that help keep out invasive species.

Today on Stateside, Google's education evangelist says he's living proof that education disrupts poverty. We also learn watching TV is good for you – in space, that is. Also today, we hear about a prisoner awaiting resentencing while knowing he could get life without parole again.

Today on Stateside, we learn how Michigan is fighting hepatitis A to prevent its spread. And, we look back at the history of the Mackinac Bridge in honor of its 60th birthday. Also on the show, we discuss the court-martial that begins today for the Marine drill instructor accused of abusing Muslim recruits.

On this Halloween day, we hear how hauntings and paranormal activities abound in Michigan. We also learn about the honor system state legislators have when it comes to spending campaign donations. And, researchers explain what sheep have to do with a possible cure for Huntington's Disease.

This Wednesday marks the start of the open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare.

This fifth enrollment season is the first one under President Trump, and it’s marked by what critics call his efforts to undermine the ACA.

Marianne Udow-Phillips from the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation joined Stateside to walk us through what to expect.

Listen above for the full conversation, or read highlights below.

Some of us turn to social media to stay connected with friends and family. Others use social media as a megaphone to spread messages of hate.

Social media outlets wrestle with striking a balance. How do they allow free speech yet not let trolls and haters wreak their havoc? Just banning the troll doesn’t make much of a difference. It’s easy to change a screen name and jump right back out there lobbing hate-filled posts.

What if the focus shifted from cracking down on the trolls to taking away their online hangouts? A recent study by researchers at Emory University, Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Michigan explored that very question.

Affordable Care Act enrollment opens this week for the first time under President Trump. Today on Stateside, we learn what's changed. And, Michigan Radio's sports commentator discusses the need for higher medical standards in the Big Ten.

Today on Stateside, an author details the "ecological unraveling" of the Great Lakes. We also hear why Detroit was the "obvious choice" for the inaugural Women's Convention, and how state regulators could shift the medical marijuana industry to benefit some and keep others out. Also today, Sen. Gary Peters joins the show and says, "We can't just have an open blank check for military use around the world."

One of President Trump’s key campaign promises was to rewrite the North American Free Trade Act to be a better deal with the United States, or he promised to scrap the trade pact with Canada and Mexico.

Talks are happening right now to renegotiate the trade deal, and Jamie Clover Adams wants to make sure that Michigan agriculture is protected, no matter what happens to NAFTA.

How do we keep eager young teachers eager? And keep them in the profession?

The future of our children’s education rests on that answer. One big way to keep young teachers working is to prevent burnout.

She wants to wrestle with the University of Michigan-Dearborn men’s team, but the National Collegiate Wrestling Association (NCWA) says its rules are clear: “Women wrestle women, men wrestle men in practice and competition. Period.”

Now wrestler Marina Goocher has the ACLU on her side in her fight to compete against the men. That includes staff attorney Bonsitu Kitaba with the ACLU of Michigan.

Today on Stateside, the state agriculture chief warns against scrapping NAFTA, and the only female wrestler at UM Dearborn explains why she's fighting for a chance to compete against men. Also today, we recap Detroit's only mayoral debate with one of the panelists who questioned the candidates last night.

Twelve communities in Oakland County are still under a boil-water alert as repairs continue on what’s being called an “unprecedented” water main break.

Jim Nash, Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner, joined Stateside today to explain where things stand now.

The "gales of November" came early to the Upper Peninsula and Lake Superior. To make things extra interesting, snow hit the ground today too, and more is on the way.

On Tuesday, this stormy weather produced a 28.8-foot wave at the Granite Island buoy located north of Marquette, says MLive chief meteorologist Mark Torregrossa.

The last American troops left Vietnam on March 29, 1973.

America's direct intervention in the Vietnam War was at an end, after many bloody years, and 58,220 American lives lost.

Afterward, the nation, and those Vietnam veterans, had a tough time processing and talking about this war that did not end with victory.

Why does Michigan have some of the highest auto insurance premiums in the nation?

Crain’s Detroit Business and Bridge Magazine dug into the heart of the question that affects every single driver in our state by analyzing insurance data over a 14 year span. They found that repairing people costs a whole lot more than repairing cars. Most of your auto insurance now goes to PIP, or Personal Injury Protection.

The word “magic” may conjure images of witches and wizards casting spells in a bygone era, long before the rise of science and modern civilization.

However, there is a spot in Michigan where magic still thrives.

Today on Stateside we learn how a tiny Michigan town became the Magic Capital of the World. And, as Vietnam vets age, a Traverse City author asks Americans to hear their stories of war and coming home. We also talk about the highest wave ever recorded in Lake Superior, and why Michigan's auto insurance rates are so high.

Every once in a while, you hear a news report about a newborn infant left in a dumpster or trashcan. Those stories can trigger feelings of sadness, loss, and bewilderment.

Before 2001, desperate parents in Michigan didn't have many options if they couldn't care for their newborn. Abandoning a child is a ten-year felony.

But in 2001, Michigan's Safe Delivery of Newborns law was passed. It allows parents to surrender their newborns inside a safe place, no questions asked. It's anonymous, safe, and legal.

Over 200 babies have been delivered to safety through the program.

Theater happenings around Michigan this week range from a sequel to the Phantom of the Opera to a show about systemic racism.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside to talk about those shows and more.

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