Stateside Staff

To understand why African-American Detroiters hit a breaking point with the city's police force in July 1967, we must turn to the history of the Detroit Police Department, and how white officers treated black men, women and children.

The seventh season of HBO’s Game of Thrones premiered this week. The show is a ground-breaker in many ways, including becoming TV’s first global blockbuster.

University of Michigan professor of media studies Amanda Lotz joined Stateside to explain why and how Game of Thrones gained such success without the use of the internet like many TV show success stories these days.

The Next Idea

It’s the quintessential American success story. Three young, black engineers left a major technology corporation to form their own business. They built it into an internationally successful company and eventually sold it. 

Today’s guest on The Next Idea, David Tarver, was one of the engineers who founded Telecom Analysis Systems over 30 years ago amid the challenges and promise of the post-Civil Rights era. 

Online readers of the Detroit Free Press logged on last week and were greeted with a surprise: No more traditional Olde English typeface known as "Blackletter".

Instead, readers found a custom typeface: Unify Sans and Unify Serif, to be specific. And a blue circle, which is the look of USA Today.

And that's exactly what the owners of the Free Press want, because the venerable Detroit paper is owned by Gannett/USA Today Network. Immediately, howls of dismay and outrage went up on social media.

Keeping backyard chickens is getting more popular in Michigan, as more communities decide to let residents maintain backyard coops.

Megan Nichols is a public health veterinarian with the Centers for Disease Control. She says keeping backyard chickens is linked to salmonella outbreaks.

It was almost 4 a.m. on July 23, 1967 when police raided the Detroit blind pig owned by William Scott II. As they led the occupants of the illegal after-hours drinking club out to waiting paddy-wagons, a crowd gathered. Frustrated by years of racism and police abuse, the crowd soon grew angry with the police.

These were the beginning moments of the 1967 Detroit Riot, which would last five days, eventually claiming 43 lives.

If you've ever been driving through the countryside, unsure of exactly where you are, maybe you’ve told a friend: “I passed some podunk town in the middle of nowhere.”

Many Michiganders are familiar with the saying. But there’s really only one Podunk, Michigan.


In the second installment of our series showcasing the Detroit music scene we welcome back to Stateside Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine and Khalid Bhatti, executive editor of Detroit Music Magazine, to introduce three more talented artists.

Stateside 7.19.2017

Jul 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get to know the family at the center of the 1967 unrest in Detroit. And, we take a stroll with the Anishinaabe water walkers as they trek from Minnesota to Quebec to honor and protect the Great Lakes.

Stateside 7.17.2017

Jul 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn how a secretive development could force drastic change on small-town Durand. And, a historian explains how the divide between "White Detroit" and "Black Detroit" led to the city's 1967 rebellion.

Stateside 7.18.2017

Jul 18, 2017

Today, we hear what it was like to be a young, black police officer in Detroit during the 1967 rebellion. We also learn how a Detroit native and former Canadian Football League player ended up in a Chinese jail.

Stateside 7.14.17

Jul 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we talk to a woman who got job training to get into the workforce and ran into another hurdle. Also, in light of the discontent of the working class some conservatives are thinking maybe unions make sense, if they could be tweaked. Plus, we visit with our latest “Artisan of Michigan.”

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

There’s good news to talk about in the re-invention of Detroit and the push to wean Michigan’s economy away from big manufacturing.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes thinks Michigan is “open for business, again.”

Fast food is not good for us. That's not exactly a secret.

Nutritionists point to all that fat and salt in fast food as one of the main causes of the growing obesity rate in this county, and elsewhere around the world.

There's a commonly held belief that poor people eat more fast food than any other group.

University of Michigan-Dearborn Economics Professor Patricia Smith decided to test that belief in a study on fast food consumption. She found that the poor don’t actually eat more fast food than anyone else. It is those who are busiest, often the middle class, that do.

President Donald Trump's budget plan contains cuts to programs like housing subsidies, child care assistance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, and other programs that serve the poor.

With so many of the programs under threat, Stateside set out to talk to people who are struggling with living paycheck to paycheck. The series takes a look at the so-called "working poor" – who they are, what challenges they face, and what policy changes might help the most people.

Iraqi nationals facing possible deportation from the U.S. won an important victory in court this week. Tuesday, Detroit U.S. District Court Judge Mark Goldsmith issued a ruling that put a pause on any government plans to deport an estimated 1,400 Iraqi nationals living in the United States with final orders of removal.  

Stateside 7.13.2017

Jul 13, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get to know a low-income family that scrapes by on government assistance and odd jobs. And, we hear how this weekend's festival on Belle Isle aims to create community connections through wind, wind crafts, and string.


The Trump administration’s proposed budget would potentially cut housing subsidies, child care assistance, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program and other programs that serve the poor by staggering amounts.

In response to that, Stateside is beginning a new series looking at the so-called working poor — who they are, what challenges they face and what policy changes might help the most people.

Congress has until the end of September to finalize a budget for the new fiscal year. The Trump Administration has proposed drastic cuts to science and research. While some in Congress are calling for spending increases.

The scientific community is sounding clear warnings about what curbing research funding would mean for the United States. A new analysis by University of Michigan researchers finds the U.S. would lose its top spot as a contributor to science research. Meanwhile, a huge competitor is ready to leap ahead: China.

If you like bird watching, Pere Cheney is a great place to see the Kirtland Warbler. Other than that, there isn't much there.

It's what you might call a ghost town.

If you're wondering how that happened, you're not alone. Michigan Radio listener Olivia Cushway of Ypsilanti posed that very question to our MI Curious team. 

Today is the only day this month that Michigan's lawmakers are in session, and the House used it to vote on a major new tax incentive for businesses.

Months of lively debate ended when the tax incentive package passed with bipartisan support. It was a vote that defied House Republican leaders and Speaker Tom Leonard, and served up a big win for Governor Rick Snyder.

Stateside 7.12.2017

Jul 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we answer listener Olivia Cushway's question: "How did Pere Cheney become a ghost town?" And, we hear why there are fewer and fewer avenues to the middle class for low-income families.

Returning from the 4th of July recess, Senate Republicans are going to try again to come up with a health care bill that can win the 50 votes it needs to pass.

Word is, they hope to have a revised health bill to show senators by week's end, perhaps by Thursday.

There is no better reminder of what a diverse state we live in than contemplating the differences between the Upper Peninsula and the Lower Peninsula.

Wil Rankinen​ is an associate professor of communication sciences and disorders at Grand Valley State. He's also a born and raised "Yooper." Rankinen is spending his summer exploring the way Yoopers talk by criss-crossing the UP to record long-time residents.

Summer is a time for crowd pleasers in the theater world.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside for another round of Theater Talk, highlighting the newest summer shows.

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