Stateside Staff

Stateside 9.25.2017

Sep 25, 2017

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon explains how President Trump divided football fans this weekend, and how the Lions "got screwed yet again." And, back from the Mackinac Republican Leadership Conference, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team details how support for the president was widespread, yet divided in tone.

Stateside 9.22.2017

Sep 22, 2017

Today on Stateside, Senator Gary Peters calls the latest ACA repeal attempt "worse than the last," and we hear why Flint charges against the director of the Department of Health and Human Services may seriously inhibit state government decision making. We also learn ICE raids increased across the state this week, and why natural disasters in certain countries prompt more immigration to the United States. And, we head into the weekend cheering whiskey made from beer.

Standing on the shores of the Great Lakes on a sunny late-summer day, it’s virtually impossible to think of those sparkling waves as a death trap.

But divers have seen what those angry lakes can do to a ship.

Becky Kagan Schott, noted underwater photographer, joined Stateside to discuss what it’s like to document these untouched wrecks.

The Next Idea

 

So many innovative ideas begin with inventors observing simple events. Take Newton’s falling apple, for example, or Archimedes’ overflowing bathtub. 

For Emil Ureel of West Michigan, it was building an ice rink in his backyard — or rather designing a refrigeration system to keep it from melting.

 

I thermodynamically ended up producing a chiller system from a used central air unit,” Ureel said. “Going through the process, I learned something related to thermodynamics that’s referred to as saturation vapor pressure.”

There are 100,000 unfilled jobs right now in Michigan.

Roger Curtis, director of the Michigan Department of Talent and Economic Development, said this is due to a career awareness gap rather than a talent gap in the state.

It's a big game hunt, with big investment and a lot of jobs on the line. 

This week, Wisconsin's governor signed the legislation that landed a monster project from Taiwan-based Foxconn, which is promising a $10 billion investment and up to 13,000 jobs. 

But at what price to taxpayers?

Does killing coyotes make things safer for livestock?

Last winter, Stateside did a story about a sporting goods store near the Irish Hills that held a bounty hunt on coyotes. The store said the hunt came in response to customers who expressed worry about their chicken coops and family dogs.

Megan Draheim, a lecturer in conservation biology and human dimensions of wildlife at Virginia Tech, joined Stateside today with a differing perspective. She said there’s no evidence that killing coyotes makes livestock safer. In fact, she said it can make the coyote-human problem even worse.

Stateside 9.21.2017

Sep 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, a diver shares what it's like to photograph Great Lakes shipwrecks. And, a conservation biologist explains why killing coyotes is an impractical, unethical, and not always successful way to keep livestock safe. We also hear how education, business, and labor leaders are teaming up to help kids find pathways to technical careers.

When your biggest customer talks, smart companies listen. For car makers, that customer is China.

So when China recently announced it's preparing to ban vehicles powered by fossil fuels, auto executives around the world quickly took notice.

Russell Padmore, a BBC business reporter, joined Stateside to talk about the future of the auto industry, and he says China’s not alone.

Stateside 9.20.2017

Sep 20, 2017

Governor Snyder signed legislation into law today that could greatly increase corporate and special interest spending on political campaigns. Today on Stateside, a watchdog says the new law will make it harder to trace political donations. And, now that China plans to ban cars powered by fossil fuels, where does that leave American manufacturers?

Stateside 9.19.2017

Sep 19, 2017

Today, we hear what went down at Monday's meeting of the Michigan Pipeline Safety Advisory Board, including a plan for a risk assessment of Enbridge's aging Line 5. And, we take a listen to the political music of Eminem, Kid Rock, and Insane Clown Posse.

The Lions will play under the Monday night spotlight this evening as they face off against the Giants.

Last week, fans watched the team start the season with a win – amidst errors all over the place.

There’s an old adage that laughter is the best medicine. 

Michigan State University psychiatrist Dr. Farha Abbasi believes there’s some scientific truth to that. 

Stateside 9.18.2017

Sep 18, 2017

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Sander Levin says the White House is gutting funding for programs that help people sign up for health care. And Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon explains why the red zone was kryptonite for the Wolverine offense this weekend.

Stateside 9.15.17

Sep 15, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from a Republican Congressman who voted against cutting the EPA budget by 25 percent. Plus, we get some commentary on the Michigan Legislature's move to allow unlimited amounts of dark money for election campaigns.

Stateside 9.14.2017

Sep 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Oakland County is fighting efforts to fix a "woefully inadequate" system for people who can't afford lawyers. And, we discuss what it means to be black and Muslim in Michigan. 

Gretchen Whitmer is one of the most well-known candidates among the Democrats who are vying to become Michigan’s next governor.

The former state Senate minority leader is viewed by many as a front-runner in the race.

Now James Blanchard, former Michigan governor, is endorsing Whitmer as his choice for the position.

Gretchen Whitmer is one of the most well-known candidates among the Democrats who are vying to become Michigan’s next governor.

The former state Senate minority leader is viewed by many as a front-runner in the race.

Now James Blanchard, former Michigan governor, is endorsing Whitmer as his choice for the position.

Michigan continues to wrestle with how to regulate and license medical marijuana dispensaries.

But there’s a potentially bigger issue facing the budding cannabis industry: the prospect that someone is trying to build a national monopoly on legal weed.

 

The magic of theater is coming to Michigan in a new, unique form. Starting today through Sunday, the University of Michigan Center for World Performance Studies hosts the National Theatre of Ghana

The centerpiece of this residency is a series of open-air performances of the Tennessee Williams one-act play 10 Blocks on the Camino Real. Written in 1948, it’s the story of an American sailor struggling to survive in a poor foreign town.

Stateside 9.13.2017

Sep 13, 2017

What happens if a mysterious company becomes the Monsanto of marijuana? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, we hear former Governor James Blanchard explain why he supports Gretchen Whitmer for governor.

Stateside 9.12.2017

Sep 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear state House Speaker Tom Leonard, R-DeWitt, break down the House of Representatives' legislative priorities for this session. And, we learn why Howell is considered the KKK capital of Michigan.

Last Thursday, commerce giant Amazon announced it would build a second corporate headquarters, known as Amazon HQ2, somewhere in North America. It's now up to metropolitan areas across the country to show they're the best option to meet the company's needs.

"It's going to set off an inter-state bidding war," said Chad Livengood, a senior reporter covering Detroit for Crain's Detroit Business.

The Unabomber was one of America's most notorious outlaws of the 20th Century. And he may have never been caught if it weren't for a little help from here in Michigan.

Premiering this past August on the Discovery Channel, the new show "Manhunt: Unabomber" recreates the efforts by law enforcement to apprehend one of the country's most wanted men at the time.

From 1978 to 1995, someone mailed or hand-delivered a series of bombs. Three people were killed and 23 others were hurt.

18 years of fear ended on April 3, 1996. That’s when FBI agents swarmed a remote cabin in Montana and arrested Theodore Kaczynski.

Stateside 9.11.2017

Sep 11, 2017

Today on Stateside, we revisit the day Muhammad Ali went to Ground Zero. And, we learn why one researcher think's Amazon's second headquarters competition is a "red herring."

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