Stateside Staff

Stateside 5.11.2018

May 11, 2018

Today on Stateside, a startup CEO says neighbors, not just millionaires, can invest in Detroit too. And, an MSU trustee calls for a "new day." But is it too late?

Stateside 5.10.2018

May 10, 2018

Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon has covered many sports for numerous media outlets. Today on Stateside, he talks to us about his latest book, a collection of stories and essays written between 1992 and 2018. Plus, the GOP candidates for governor hold their first debate. And we hear what henna tattoos can do for women battling cancer.

Stateside 5.9.2018

May 10, 2018

Today, a special edition of Stateside with the story of Richard Phillips, falsely accused and wrongly convicted in a 1971 murder. Plus, our Michigan history segment looks into the state’s tourism campaigns through the years.

If you recognize the lyric, "Yes Michigan! The feeling’s forever," you’re probably not alone (and no longer in your 20s). The words stem from the “Yes Michigan” tourism ad campaign from the 1980s.

Stateside 5.8.2018

May 8, 2018

Today on Stateside, we play a new mixtape from West Michigan featuring The Go Rounds, Lady Ace Boogie, The Founding, and The Hacky Turtles. Also today, we discuss mandatory reporting and whether it hurts survivors of campus sexual assault.

Stateside 5.7.2018

May 7, 2018

Can safe injection sites help reduce drug use and disease in Grand Rapids? We discuss that question today on Stateside. Also today, we hear where 2019 budget talks stand right now. 

Stateside 5.4.2018

May 4, 2018

Today on Stateside, we talk to attorney Mark Bernstein about the Michigan communities joining the lawsuit to get drugmakers to pay for the societal costs of the opioid crisis. And, in our latest edition of Artisans of Michigan, host Lester Graham visits a broom-squire near Rockford.

The EPA has handed down a clear message to Michigan: your air is not clear. The agency says too many people are living in areas with unacceptable smog levels, and it is giving the state three years to come up with a plan to clean up the air.

For decades, January in Southeast Michigan has meant it's time for the auto show.  

Thousands trek to Cobo Center for the North American International Auto Show, often picking their way through snow and ice, but it seems that the snow may give way to autumn leaves. 

You may know M-43 as the state road that runs through Williamston and on past Lansing, aka Grand River. But more and more beer lovers are recognizing M-43 as their favorite brew.

This New England-style India pale ale has made a world of difference for Old Nation Brewing Company, based in Williamston.

Stateside 5.3.2018

May 3, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn the EPA is telling Michigan to clean up smog just as the agency unwinds clean air regulations. And, as foreign car makers ditch the Detroit auto show, organizers consider a date change.

The Michigan Legislature is considering a bill that would allow both zoos and other facilities to breed large carnivores, such as lions, tigers, and bears.

Such breeding was outlawed in 2000. But House Bill 5778 would lift that ban.

When do you know the time has come to seek mental health care? Then, where do you go? To whom do you turn?

It's a critical question in the quest for mental health and wellness, and we don't tend to think about it until there's a crisis.


   

Last week, the Board of State Canvassers approved a ballot petition that might end the prohibition of recreational marijuana in Michigan

 

Meanwhile, this week marked the 100th anniversary of another important social experiment: Prohibition. 

 

She may be busy with her double major in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Physics, but Kettering University student Ruth Willet always finds time for her passion: amateur radio – also known as "ham radio." 

Stateside 5.2.2018

May 3, 2018

How do you know when it's time to seek mental health treatment? We hear that answer today on Stateside. And, we learn the zoo community is split over the best way to lift Michigan's ban on breeding large carnivores.

Siwatu-Salama Ra is a young Detroit activist who was sentenced to two years in prison for brandishing a licensed and unloaded firearm in what she claims was an act of self-defense. Her conviction has raised questions about the nature of black gun ownership in the United States.

How can Michigan attract and retain new talent? That's a question we've been hearing from Governor Snyder's office and executive suites on down for years.

Earlier this month, a General Motors executive told a roomful of automotive engineers that the autonomous vehicle revolution will bypass Detroit unless the region addresses its talent deficit.

More than 1,000 people marched through the streets of downtown Grand Rapids Tuesday in support of immigrants and protesting deportations.

Andy Johnston is the VP of government and corporate affairs for the Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce. He joined Stateside to explain how immigrants play a crucial role in the Grand Rapids economy.

Detroit's back in control of its finances: it's out of oversight.

It's a big moment for a city that only three years ago exited the biggest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history.

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joined Stateside today to explain what exactly being out of oversight means for Detroit and its people.

Stateside 5.1.2018

May 1, 2018

Today on Stateside, University of Michigan graduates discuss why so many of their classmates don't stay in Michigan. And, armed with history, black gun owners weigh in on exercising their Second Amendment rights.

With the weather warming up and the sun chasing away memories of the long stretch of cold, icy weather that lasted well into April, many Michigan communities are ramping up for tourist season.

That season is the economic lifeblood of many areas in Michigan, like Ludington, for instance.

 

 

Some 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust, and those who survived have lived so long, they're now watching the world forget. 

 

A recent poll shows 66 percent of American millennials don't know what Auschwitz is. Another 22 percent had not heard of the Holocaust or weren't sure if they had. 

 

It’s easy to picture “comfort food,” but what about “discomfort food?”

That’s what Tunde Wey will be serving up in the pop-restaurant Saartj, running from May 2 to May 5 inside the community space Bank Suey in Hamtramck.

 

 

Think of it as a sort of Nobel Prize for businesses: the Oslo Business for Peace Award. 

 

The Business for Peace Foundation each year honors business leaders who use their business skills to do good: to help the economy, to help society, and to do it in a way that is ethical and responsible. 

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