Stateside Staff

He denies the accusations that he has harassed women through the years. Yet, Democratic Congressman John Conyers said Sunday he is stepping down as the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee.

To put this move into context, Detroit Free Press Washington reporter Todd Spangler and Democratic Congresswoman Debbie Dingell joined Stateside Monday.

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., says the process for handling harassment complaints in Congress needs "immediate changes." And, a Hall of Fame teacher explains why classrooms of the future should not include whiteboards and markers.

Today on Stateside, former MSU and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar pleads guilty to first-degree criminal sexual conduct. Then, Detroit artist Carl Wilson using powerful linoleum prints to tell overlooked stories. And, we'll go back to the first Detroit Lions Thanksgiving Day game. 

Time for us to listen to some new music from Detroit area artists.

Our guides are Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine and executive editor Khalid Bhatti.

DeJ Loaf - “Changes”

Colleges and universities are seeking ways to reach more students, and bring in more money.

One way to do that is to hire an outside company to market and support online programs. That company recruits students for online degrees branded with the name of that university.

Think for a moment of what a cyber-attack would mean for business, for government, for health care systems. Without the internet, it'd be incredibly difficult to function.

That's why Governor Snyder recently signed a law creating the Michigan Cyber Civilian Corps (MiC3). Think of it as a volunteer fire brigade that's ready to be called up in the event of a cyber-attack or other internet threat.

Today on Stateside, we discuss the sexual harassment claims about long-time Detroit Democratic Congressman John Conyers. Among other things, the Congressman is alleged to have used taxpayer money to settle a sexual harassment complaint made by a female staffer. And, a professor argues Eastern Michigan University's deal to boost online classes dilutes the value of degrees.

Today on Stateside, the president of Kalamazoo College explains why it's baffling to him that Congress would try to impose a "tax on knowledge." And, we learn how a third-grade reading law could hold back 70 percent of English language learners.

Today on Stateside, we hear how the USDA is working to regain trust of minority and female farmers. And, after thinking his career was over, Jeff Daniels explains he's now busier than ever. 

Think about this: providing enough meat to make more than half a million meals for people in need. That's over 100,000 pounds of meat, and much of it is venison.

That's the remarkable result of of Tom Cullimore's work through his effort called HOPE: Help Other People Eat. 

By rallying hunters, one man has donated more than half a million meals to shelters. He joined Stateside today. Also on the show, we learn why one group is putting books in laundromats and why Detroit's housing demolition program is "partially to blame" for rising lead levels in the city's kids.

Firearm deer season starts today and thousands of hunters are heading out with their rifles. But around this time of year, there's a tiny group of Michiganders heading out with birds instead.

As thousands of hunters head out with rifles today, a tiny group of Michiganders heads out with birds instead. We talk with one of those falconers on Stateside​. Also today, an ecologist says biodiversity could be the planet's "insurance policy," but only if we act fast. And, we learn Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar is considering a guilty plea to charges he sexually assaulted young athletes.

There’s something that seems to have united state officials and representatives across party lines and despite political disagreements.

That something is a new safety report from Enbridge Energy on Line 5, the pipeline that runs beneath the Straits of Mackinac.

November 15th is the start of firearm hunting season in Michigan, which runs until the 30th. That got us wondering about the best ways to cook and serve venison.

Myles Anton is the executive chef and owner of Trattoria Stella in Traverse City. He spoke with Stateside’s Cynthia Canty about his favorite methods for preparing venison.

Macomb County Commissioners are turning to a rather obscure state law to help them get the county clerk's office back on track, and possibly remove County Clerk Karen Spranger.

The commissioners hope this state law will force Spranger to answer questions about the way she's running her office, and about the many problems that have piled up since the Republican clerk took office in January.

Macomb County Commissioner Leon Drolet joined Stateside today to give us the latest.

You've probably heard of the Trail of Tears, when more than 4,000 Native American men, women, and children died in a series of forced removals from their homeland in the Southeastern U.S. to present-day Oklahoma. They were members of the Cherokee, Seminole, Muscogee, Chickasaw, and Choctaw nations.

But there was another Trail of Tears much closer to us. It's the Sandy Lake Tragedy of 1850. Hundreds of Ojibwe people died as the U.S. government tricked them into leaving their homes in the Upper Great Lakes and traveling to northern Minnesota. 

It's known as the Chippewa Trail of Tears, and the Wisconsin Death March.

A music lover can likely pinpoint the moment a song or a lyric crashes its way into your young consciousness. And then things are never the same.

For writer Daniel Wolff, that moment happened in 1965, when he first heard Bob Dylan.

David Kiley of Encore Michigan joined Stateside to talk about a few of the latest theater productions happening around the state. 

Today on Stateside, a pipeline safety expert says the latest Line 5 controversy is about lack of trust and transparency. And, we hear venison recipes and cooking tips from the chef of Traverse City's Trattoria Stella.

If a juvenile lifer maintains his innocence, he may never get out of prison. We learn why that is today on Stateside. And, the executive director of the Michigan Head Start Association says the program's infrastructure is "very solid"despite the 11 centers closing in Southwest Detroit.

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint Township, talks about the tax reform plan being worked out in Washington. Then, are prisoners in Michigan cut out of civil rights protection? The federal court says no. The Attorney General disagrees. Plus, listen to the story of how the U.S. Army air-dropped pianos onto World War II battlefields. 

Today on Stateside, Rep. Upton says the Republican tax plan will make us "more competitive with the rest of the world." We also hear about a program that helps veterans find camaraderie through beekeeping. And, after being released this spring, a former juvenile lifer talks college, forgiveness, and second chances.

Michigan singer-songwriter Joshua Davis released a new studio album, The Way Back Home, on Oct. 13.

The album comes some two and a half years after NBC’s The Voice introduced the rest of America to Davis, who had already built a strong fan base throughout his home state.

Davis joined Stateside to talk about his music and his inspirations.

Imagine being a little kid, driving home late at night with your dad.

You drop off to sleep, more or less, but you're awake enough to feel your dad scoop you up, carry you into the house, and gently tuck you into bed.

Now imagine that dad is NHL legend Gordie Howe, and he's tucking you in just a short time after he thrilled thousands of Detroit Red Wings fans cheering for Mr. Hockey at Olympia Stadium.

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