Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, an alleged victim of Larry Nassar says MSU president Lou Anna Simon's apology was "heartless and empty." We also discuss what it means to be neighbors again for black and Jewish communities in Detroit. And, we review the good, the bad, and the ugly that came out of Lansing in 2017.

A lot could happen in the coming days. Congress is poised to deal with several major issues, including the Republicans' tax overhaul and funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program. U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow joined Stateside today to discuss those issues, and more. Also on the show today, EMU officials defend the university's contract to boost online degrees, saying professors' concerns are unwarranted.

Women don't just face sexual assault at work. Today on Stateside, we hear how it happens at home too. And, we talk to a Detroit designer working to bring more black women into architecture and urban planning. (Right now, only .3% of architects are black women.) We also hear why two teachers left Michigan to work in another state.

There's no shortage of Christmas productions this season. And, as always, David Kiley of Encore Michigan tells about a few of the latest happening around the state. 

Listen above to hear his take on the following:

“Inspiration in the wake of desperation.” That’s the theme of a powerful documentary called For Flint.

In the film, director Brian Schulz shows the foundation for a rebuilt Flint can be found in the lives of its neighbors.

An archeological dig yields more than arrowheads, shards of pottery, or pieces of jewelry.

They also yield bones.

A research team at the University of Michigan has been studying some ancient dog bones dug up in Germany. In doing so, they’ve uncovered new clues about when our faithful domesticated dog evolved from wolves.

Today's MI Curious question is especially timely with given that the South Korea winter Olympics are right around the corner.

Why do so many international Olympic figure skaters train in Metro Detroit?

The question came from listener Dan Major of Clinton Township. To find the answer, Stateside went to the Detroit Skating Club in Bloomfield Hills. 

Today on Stateside, we discuss why the heat on MSU has gone from "zero to 100." We also talk to subjects of the new documentary on Flint that looks for "inspiration in the wake of desperation." And, we answer this MI Curious question: Why do so many international Olympic figure skaters train in Michigan?

What's happening with the state's poorest performing schools?

The upcoming holiday break kind of marks the half-way point in the school year.

That's especially important for the 37 Michigan schools fighting for their lives.

Think for a moment about your most deeply held beliefs. Can you recall when you first formed them? Has it been so long that it feels as if they've just always been there?

Research suggests our beliefs may change, for better or for worse, without our even noticing. And that’s being reflected in public opinions that have shifted since Donald Trump launched his campaign for President.

The Next Idea

Advances in computer technology are one of many factors that have led to the decline of certain types of jobs. To some extent, technology has always played a role in changing how people work and live: think of the internal combustion engine or factory mechanization.

But today’s guest on The Next Idea wonders if advances in artificial intelligence could be a tipping point into societal unrest, even revolt, because of loss of jobs.

Several of the women who've accused President Trump of sexual assault and harassment held a news conference today.

It was the first time the women appeared together. All have accused the President of groping, fondling, or forcing kisses on them. And they're calling on Congress to investigate their claims.

They're coming forward at a time when a series of women have accused high-profile men in entertainment, journalism and politics of sexual assault. It's become known as the "Me Too" movement.

Today on Stateside, we discuss whether people will revolt when artificial intelligence comes for white-collar jobs. We also get an update on the Hepatitis A outbreak continuing in southeast Michigan, and we learn what to do if you're sexually harassed at work. 

Today on Stateside, we hear from an opponent of the recreational marijuana ballot proposal, and we discuss former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar's sentence to 60 years in federal prison. We also talk about whether "passive homes" are the future, and how dog sledding joined the pack of popular winter sports in Michigan.

Since John Conyers resigned Tuesday from his 13th District Congressional seat, which he held for 53 years, the race is shaping up to replace him.

Zach Gorchow, editor of Gongwer News Service, and Rick Pluta, Michigan Radio’s Lansing bureau chief, joined Stateside to discuss who’s lining up to succeed the former dean of the House.

Of all the ignored or argued over household chores, one near the top of the list, particularly for cat owners, is replacing the kitty litter. But did you know that without the ingenuity of a Michigander, we might be changing out the kitty sand?

Mark Harvey, the Michigan History Center’s State Archivist, joined Stateside to talk about the Michigan history of kitty litter.

Who might run to replace U.S. Rep. John Conyers in Congress? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, we discuss a survey that shows sexism and sexual harassment persist throughout the auto industry. We also hear why soccer analyst Alexi Lalas doesn't see Detroit winning the bid for an MLS team – or at least, not yet.

In the second edition of UN/DIVIDED, a three-part series from Michigan Radio, we learn why school choice led to school closures in Albion. We also discuss Rep. John Conyers' resignation from Congress.

The Next Idea

It’s fair to say that the automobile has been central to the life of Bob Lutz. He’s 85 now, but before he was semi-retired he held top-tier positions at BMW, Ford, Chrysler and General Motors, where he was vice chairman.

He recently wrote an article for Automotive News with the striking headline, “Kiss the good times goodbye.” It’s about where the world of cars is headed, for better or worse. 

Today on Stateside, the Lansing State Journal's executive editor explains the front-page editorial that calls on Lou Anna Simon, president of Michigan State University, to resign over her handling of sexual assault and harassment problems. And, the former vice chairman of General Motors explains what he believes self-driving cars will mean for Detroit's future. Also today, we give you the first installment of our series UN/DIVIDED, a look Marshall's takeover of Albion schools and what it's meant for families.

How do you fill a vacant seat in Congress? Should our government work more with the private sector to build roads and bridges? And should the state seize control of local government pension funds? We bring you those answers today on Stateside.

Today on Stateside, a Muslim community leader says President Trump's retweets of anti-Muslim videos is "disappointing" and "disheartening." And, a columnist with the Detroit Free Press explains why we need to "look at who is getting a pass" in sexual abuse investigations.

Today on Stateside, we talk to a physician who nearly died at her own hospital. Now, she's calling on medical staffers everywhere to be more empathetic. Also today, a deer specialist explains chronic wasting disease's impact on animals this year and what the Department of Natural Resources has learned from deer submitted by hunters for testing. And, Enbridge defends its agreement with the state on the Line 5 pipeline.

Today on Stateside, a member of the state Pipeline Safety Advisory Board explains why the state's agreement with Enbridge "mostly goes in the wrong direction." And, in a holiday rendition of Theater Talk, we learn what's playing now on Michigan stages.

The long-held image of a teacher standing in front of a classroom holding a piece of chalk or a dry-erase marker has to die, so says teacher Matinga Ragatz​. 

Ragatz was Michigan Teacher of the Year in 2011 and earlier this year, she was inducted into the National Teachers Hall of Fame. Now, as a consultant, she's working to help teachers innovate and rethink their roles in the classroom.

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