Stateside Staff

Today on Stateside, a new committee opposing a ballot initiative on gerrymandering may hint at a partisan fight ahead, and the former EPA administrator defends Obama-era fuel efficiency standards, saying they're good for health.

Health officials in Kent County plan to investigate whether there are cancer clusters near waste dump sites once used by  the shoemaker Wolverine World Wide tannery in Rockford.

Brian Hartl, an epidemiologist with the Kent County Health Department, joined Stateside today to explain what the department knows now, and how it plans to move forward.

Jeff Daniels says he was originally going to write a comedy when he sat down to work on his newest play Flint.

But then Trump happened. And Charlottesville. 

So Daniels started to think about the precursors that might explain what made those things possible.

People in Grass Lake, in Jackson County, are arguing about their school district’s decision to allow a transgender boy in elementary school to use the boys’ restroom.

The district has plans to build privacy stalls around urinals in school buildings.

Supporters and opponents of the policy, including people who don’t live in Grass Lake, have been showing up at school board meetings even when the issue isn’t on the agenda. 

Today on Stateside, we hear how Kent County is looking for cancer clusters near Wolverine tannery dump sites. And, Jeff Daniels talks about Flint, his upcoming play about race and poisoned water. The Grass Lake schools superintendent also explains why the district chose to let a transgender student use the boys' bathroom. 

People are dying in Macomb County's overcrowded jail. Today on Stateside, we learn what role the courts play in those deaths.

Also today, a former police chief says private police bills would bring "mercenary policing" to Michigan communities. And, climate activist Bill McKibben says we've made "nowhere near enough" progress in combating climate change. Finally, we cheers to the weekend with a fall drink of Ann Arbor-made whiskey.

Eighteen people have died in the Macomb County Jail since 2012. Today on Stateside, we hear one woman's story. Also today, we learn how Michigan's gun control movement lost big 16 years ago, and why Michiganders should thank "TV money" for the late MSU-UM kickoff this weekend.

File a FOIA request, get sued.

A journalist, taxpayer, or government watchdog group can use the Freedom of Information Act to request records from a public body — maybe a government agency or state university, for instance.

The response? The public body sues the requester.

It’s happening in Michigan and spreading through the country. But what does this mean for a free press and transparency of public information?

Today (10/4)  is Count Day. For school districts in Michigan, it’s crucially important to have as many enrolled kids sitting in their seats as possible. That’s because this is one of the two days during the school year when attendance determines how much state aid schools will get.

There’s much work to do in boosting attendance, not just on Count Day.  A recent report from Johns Hopkins University finds Michigan's chronic student absence rate of 18-percent is well above the national average of 13-percent.

You might have heard the phrase, “A woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle.” But did you know that in the 1880s, leaders in Michigan decided that fish needed a train?

Congress is investigating ways Russia tried to meddle in the 2016 election, especially through social media.

The Senate Intelligence Committee has asked Facebook, Google, and Twitter to testify at a hearing on Nov. 1. The House Intelligence Committee will do the same sometime this month.

Now, an exclusive report from CNN puts Michigan at the center of this investigation – with Russian trolls and Facebook ads.

There's a new tactic that public universities, government offices, and other public entities in Michigan are using to avoid providing information to taxpayers and journalists -- who have a legal right to know what's going on. Today on Stateside, we'll learn more from a First Amendment attorney. Also, fish may not need bicycles, but at one point in Michigan history, they needed a train.  

What should you do if you think your Equifax account was breached? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, in the wake of Hurricane Maria, we hear how Michigan's Puerto Rican community is mobilizing for those in need.

It's October, and deer are in the mood for love. That means Michigan drivers are at greater risk of hitting a deer. October through December is mating season for deer, so they're extra active and on the move.

Last week we brought you a conversation centered around this question: What can white people do about racism in America?

Robin DiAngelo, an author, consultant and former professor of education, joined Stateside today to continue that conversation. She's author of the book, What Does it Mean to Be White? Developing White Racial Literacy.

One of the very top mental health concerns in this country is anxiety. It’s sometimes hard to be clear about what anxiety is and how to recognize it, especially in children, but identifying a mental health issue like anxiety early on can make a huge difference for a child’s future success.

After you flush, where does it go? Today on Stateside, we learn the answer is no longer a solution in many communities. And, we learn what anxiety disorders look like in kids, and how to treat them. 

Stateside 9.29.2017

Sep 29, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how design in Detroit's neighborhoods can involve the people, and why the world would keep warming even if we stopped emitting greenhouse gases. And, State Sen. Patrick Colbeck, R-Canton, explains why he's running for governor in 2018.

Stateside 9.28.2017

Sep 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn Toledo water is safe to drink despite bacteria blooms, "but we're not out of the woods yet." And, campus sexual assault researchers say the focus on due process comes at victims' expense.

The director of the Michigan State Police has apologized for sharing a Facebook post that called NFL players who take a knee during the national anthem "degenerates."

The Michigan Black Legislative Caucus is demanding that Governor Snyder fire Col. Kriste Kibbey Etue. The black lawmakers say they're "appalled" by the post.

But Governor Snyder says he will not ask Col. Etue to resign, citing her decades of public service.

Michigan universities say they will not immediately implement new federal guidance on campus sexual assault.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently announced that her department would rescinded the Obama-era guidance on campus sexual assault.

Most Americans say they want to protect the "DREAMers," the term often used to refer to undocumented immigrants brought here as children.

That poll was taken after President Trump announced he is phasing out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, a federal program that afforded some protections to those immigrants, and he gave Congress six months to come up with a replacement.

Three Republican senators this week announced details of their reform idea, the Succeed Act. It spells out steps for receiving "conditional status" in the U.S., including maintaining gainful employment, or pursuing higher education classes or military service. Ultimately, holders of this status could apply for a green card.

What does it take to obtain information about the Michigan Lottery? Specifically, the information about whether there are repeat winners — people cashing in on a lucky ticket over and over again at incredibly improbable odds?

That's the question a team of investigative journalists has been exploring for the Columbia Journalism Review.

Leaping from branch to branch, bearing nuts and acorns, teasing backyard dogs by staying just out of reach, let’s face it — squirrels are so common in Michigan that it’s easy for us to take their presence for granted.

But, just as Holden Caufield worried about where the ducks go in winter, we got to wondering: where do squirrels go? Do they cluster up in hibernation holes? Or perhaps join Michigan snowbirds and head south to warmer locales?

Stateside 9.26.2017

Sep 26, 2017

Today on Stateside we discuss what white people can do about racism in America and we hear how a new package of bills could mean big cuts to Michigan's high auto insurance premiums.

Pages