Stateside Staff

Stateside 2.16.2018

Feb 16, 2018

Today on Stateside, a reporter explains how race is still a factor in whether you're approved or denied a conventional mortgage. And, we learn how to judge whether or not a business benefits the community.

Stateside 2.15.2018

Feb 15, 2018

Today on Stateside, we learn why so many international Olympic figure skaters train in Michigan. And, Jeff DeGraff with The Next Idea says Michigan has the parts to build a powerful economic engine, but they need to be connected.

 

If we can't talk about love stories on Valentine's Day, when can we?  

Which is why today seemed appropriate to talk to Horizon Booksright there on Front Street in downtown Traverse City, which has a long history of romantic encounters. 

In 2012, Grand Rapids residents voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana.

And in 2016, Michigan lawmakers passed the Medical Marijuana Facilities Licensing Act, which set up the licensing and regulatory framework for the medical marijuana industry.

But as a story in MiBiz points out, despite all that, Grand Rapids has not moved towards allowing medical marijuana facilities.

Librarian Annie Spence knows what it’s like to love a book so much she has to write it a love letter. She also knows what it’s like for a break-up letter to be in order.

Her letters to books fill the pages of her own new book Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks.

Stateside 2.14.2018

Feb 15, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear why your special someone might be waiting for you at a Traverse City bookstore. And, we discuss why there aren't any medical marijuana facilities in Grand Rapids.

Stateside 2.13.2018

Feb 13, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear how uncertainty over their status is taking a toll for Michigan "DREAMers." And, Michigan hospitals push back against bills to set nurse-to-patient ratio and mandatory overtime.

The Next Idea

If you’re arrested and charged with a crime, you’ll likely be asked to “post bail.” Bail is the money that a defendant hands over to the court in order to be released from custody until their trial.

So, if you don’t have a huge bank account, where are you supposed to find, say, $50,000? Traditionally, you go to a bail bondsman.

Judd Grutman has a different idea in mind.

A skillful mining of data can give you a pretty good snapshot of how groups of people are faring -- for better or for worse.

Sarah Szurpicki wanted to find out how Michigan women are faring in education, health, and the economy.

Michigan's no-fault auto insurance law is seen as the "gold standard" in this country in terms of medical care for drivers badly hurt in a car accident.

Michigan also has the highest insurance costs in the nation, and although various fixes have been floated through the years, nothing gets traction in the state legislature.

Between a wild weekend with the Red Wings and coaching change-ups at the Lions, there’s a lot going on in the world of Michigan sports.

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator, joined Stateside to talk about the week’s news.

As part of the University of Michigan’s Bicentennial Celebration, the University of Michigan Library brought StoryCorps to campus last fall to capture personal stories of those who make up the university’s rich history.

One of the conversations featured Karen Downing, a University of Michigan librarian. She sat down with her father, Harold Johnson, to talk about what it was like for him to make history as the first black dean at the University of Michigan.

Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer?

The final answer is still far in the distance, but a team of scientists believes there is promise in newly discovered Great Lakes fungi.

Stateside 2.12.2018

Feb 12, 2018

Could a fungus from the bottom of the Great Lakes hold a cure for cancer? That answer comes today on Stateside. We also discuss why lawmakers are exploring the option to eliminate no-fault auto insurance.

Stateside 2.9.2018

Feb 9, 2018

Today on Stateside, a longtime Republican joins the board of Voters Not Politicians despite opposition from his Republican friends. Then, in the state of Maine, a Nestle Waters manager is appointed to a board that rewrites environmental rules. Could we see that in Michigan? And, we've got a new Artisan of Michigan: a sign painter.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 2.8.2018

Feb 8, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear how the vicious flu season has scientists looking for a better way to produce vaccines. And, we talk to a Suttons Bay man who celebrated face-to-face communication by walking 3,200 miles across the United States.

Stateside 2.7.2018

Feb 7, 2018

Today on Stateside, we discuss the last budget Gov. Snyder will present to the state legislature. And, three high schoolers talk about what it's like to be young women of color these days.

Stateside 2.6.2018

Feb 6, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear why some believe a gubernatorial appointment is the "cleanest way" to ensure accountability in university trustees. And, we learn there could eventually be ships without captains on the Great Lakes.

Researchers have linked a Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County to a switch to the Flint River for drinking water.

During the Legionnaires' disease outbreaks in 2014 and 2015, twelve people died and 79 people became sick.

The Next Idea

After more than three years on the air, our innovation series, The Next Idea, is coming to a close, so it seems like a good time to check back with one of the many contributors to the series.

Feliciano Paredes is a classic example of an entrepreneur who identifies a need, creates an invention to fill that need, and embarks on the journey to bring that invention to market.

With Super Bowl LII officially in the books, former Michigan quarterback Tom Brady is still at just five Super Bowl wins. 

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio’s sports commentator, joined Stateside today to discuss the big game and the week’s other news.

Stateside 2.5.2018

Feb 5, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear from a researcher who's found a link between the Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Genesee County and the switch to Flint River water. And, we talk about the crucial moment of Super Bowl LII when two former Wolverines mattered most.

Stateside 2.2.2018

Feb 2, 2018

Today on Stateside, we discuss what's recyclable and what's not in Michigan. And, we hear how the Nassar scandal raises questions for MSU alumni, parents, and prospective students. Also today, we cheers to Groundhog Day with the Saw His Shadow.

The NCAA has opened an investigation into Michigan State University's role in the Larry Nassar scandal.

This comes as the number of accusers is up to 265. 

At the same time, ESPN reports allegations of a pattern of mishandled sexual assault cases involving Spartan football and basketball players  – allegations that football coach Mark Dantonio and basketball coach Tom Izzo are still struggling to clearly address.

The late 1960s saw the birth of many activist groups fighting to change the status quo, particularly in light of the ongoing Vietnam War and Civil Rights movement.

Science for the People was one such group. It was made up of radical scientists who challenged the relationship between their work and political and economic power.

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