Daniel Wanschura

Arts & Culture Reporter/Producer

Ever since he was young, Dan has been fascinated with radio. From hearing the dulcet tones of John Gordon broadcast Minnesota Twins games, to staying up late listening to radio theater, he was captivated by the imaginative medium. 

In 2012, Dan graduated from Thomas Edison State College with a BA in Communications. In 2015, he moved from the Twin Cities to northern Michigan, to cover arts and culture at Interlochen Public Radio.

During his time at IPR, he’s produced a weekly arts and culture segment called, “The Green Room.” In 2016, Dan won a PRNDI award for his story, “Opera: relevant or outdated?” In 2017, his story about a polo club in northern Michigan earned him a Edward R. Murrow regional award. His work has also been heard on NPR, Minnesota Public Radio, Michigan Radio, and KFAI Radio.

Dan enjoys playing softball, driving on Michigan’s renown M-22 highway, and volunteering as a leader in Grand Traverse Young Life. He is also a lover of the Oxford comma— much to the chagrin of his editors.

He loves setting sound-rich scenes in his radio journalism, so naturally, a couple of his favorite stories include the time he accompanied photographers shooting a Lake Michigan storm, and when he visited award-winning cheesemakers. Another favorite was telling the story of how theater has helped a vet with PTSD.

The Pere Marquette Township Board voted to sell the Pere Marquette cross memorial to a local private group for $800.
Todd and Brad Reed Photography

A private group will buy a 40-foot cross memorial near Ludington for $800.

Last night, the Pere Marquette Township Board of Trustees voted to sell the one-acre property containing the cross to the Pere Marquette Memorial Association, which plans to maintain the cross.

The cross memorial was built in 1955. It honors Pere Marquette, a Jesuit missionary who came to Michigan in the 17th century.

Joe Beyer (right) and Michael Moore in the Traverse City Film Festival offices in downtown Traverse City.
Dan Wanschura

Michael Moore has hired Joe Beyer as the new executive director for his Traverse City Film Festival. Joe replaces Deb Lake, who resigned last December.

“It’s like we found our long-lost soul brother here for Traverse City in the being of Joe Beyer,” says Michael.

Joe Beyer returns home to Michigan after working for the Sundance Institute for over 14 years.

Chris Andrews walked across the country pushing this cart in an effort to spark face to face conversations.
Chris Andrews

A couple years ago, Chris Andrews, a senior at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, realized he was addicted to his smartphone.

“It was something I was using as a crutch,” he explains. “Something that I was using in moments of boredom, moments of anxiety, or a moment of silence in a group of friends – we’d all reach for our phones.”


Matt Shepler prepares to blend some Ambrosia Sipping Chocolate in his kitchen in Traverse City.
Dan Wanschura

Ambrosia Sipping Chocolate is a brand new, gourmet hot chocolate that’s made in Traverse City. It hits the market on April 15th.

“It’s literally like you’re drinking chocolate bars because that’s exactly what it is,” says co-owner Matt Shepler.


Jason Dake, the education curator at the Dennos Museum points out some art during a recent walk-through of the museum.
Dan Wanschura

The Dennos Museum in Traverse City has almost three-thousand works of art in its collection.

At any given time, around 280 of those works are on display, including Inuit sculptures, contemporary paintings and modern photographs.

But on April 14th, the museum wants visitors to ignore most of these works and just focus on a handful of them.  


Author Jack Hobey has written about Edward Beebe, a photographer who would often lie about the location of his photos.
Matt Mikus

Edward Beebe was a popular photographer in northern Michigan in the early 1900s. He created postcards with his photos but often deceived people regarding the location of the shots.

“I think a lot of these cards were intended to take advantage of tourists and visitors,” says local author Jack Hobey.

The Boardman Review captures what it's like to live in northern Michigan year-round.
Dan Wanschura

The Boardman Review is a quarterly publication founded by brothers Nick and Chris Loud. 

They recently published their third issue, a winter edition.

 


Anders Kelto (right) stands next to Anthony Ervin, a swimmer who is featured in Kelto's new audio series "Gamebreaker with Keith Olbermann."
Caroline Kim

When Anders Kelto listened to sports podcasts, what he usually heard was a couple of guys sitting around bantering with each other.

“There was no good audio sports journalism in the world, at least that I had been exposed to,” he says.

Anders is changing that. Today, the Traverse City native is out with his own podcast —it’s a sports documentary series.

 


Cast members for Parallel 45 Theatre's production of "Go, Dog. Go!" rehearse in Traverse City Wednesday night.
Dan Wanschura

Parallel 45 Theatre is about to try something new.

The professional theatre company started in Traverse City seven years ago and typically produces three to four shows throughout the year.

Next year, the company wants to produce more shows, for more people. 

Jeremy Reisig, aka brotha James, is coming out with his second album in April.
brothajames.com

Jeremy Reisig, better known as brotha James, is a one-man band from Elk Rapids.

He’ll do all sorts of things — beatbox, play the guitar, rap, sing — sometimes all in the same song. He’s able to do all that because he often loops his own music tracks.

 


American cross-country skier Jessie Diggins (left) won Team USA's first-ever Olympic gold medal in South Korea on Wednesday.
Noah Hoffman

For the first time ever, the United States cross-country ski team has won an Olympic gold medal. 

Eli Brown, a ski technician from Traverse City, did his part to help make it happen.


Michael Cleveland, blind from birth, is one of the most accomplished fiddlers in bluegrass music.
www.flamekeeperband.com

Michael Cleveland has been called “one of the premier fiddle players of his generation, if not in all of bluegrass history.”

He's also been completely blind since birth.

 


The 1968 Mustang Fastback used in the film "Bullitt" is on display at the Hagerty Insurance building in Traverse City.
Dan Wanschura

The Ford Mustang from the 1968 film “Bullitt” is currently on display at the Hagerty Insurance in Traverse City.


Interlochen Arts Academy Band Director Matthew Schlomer leads students in a recent dress rehearsal.
Interlochen Center for the Arts

When "The Soldier's Tale" premiered in 1918, an influenza epidemic cut short it's European performance tour.

Ironically, the flu caused some problems for Interlochen Arts Academy students as they practiced for the show earlier this year.


Eli Brown stares down one of his skis in his wax trailer, just off the VASA Trail in Traverse City. Brown will head to South Korea to serve as ski support for Team USA cross-country skiers during the 2018 Winter Olympics.
David Cassleman

Eli Brown spent years training for the Winter Olympics, and now he’s finally going. But Brown isn’t competing as an athlete. Instead, he’s making sure the U.S. cross-country ski team has the fastest skis possible.

Luis Resto brings his Detroit-based band to northern Michigan this weekend.
Dan Wanschura

Songwriter and producer Luis Resto says other music scenes are more polished than Detroit, but that’s one reason why the Motor City is so special to him.  

“Detroit has this street grit, what we call ‘stank,’” he says. “Which is good.”


A memorial service will be held Saturday for Piper, the dog who worked at the Cherry Capital Airport.
airportk9.org

A memorial service will be held this weekend for Piper, the goggles-wearing dog who worked at the Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City.


Traverse City author Doug Stanton wrote 'Horse Soliders,' which is the basis for the new film '12 Strong.' The film opens in theaters nationwide January 19.
Dan Wanschura

Next week, the movie based on Doug Stanton’s book ‘Horse Soldiers’ will hit theaters nationwide. It’s about a small group of Special Forces who rode horses to fight the Taliban.

“It’s a Western with lasers,” says Doug.

Pines of Arcadia is a new artist residency near Manistee.
Dan Wanschura

Pines of Arcadia. That’s the name of a new artist residency and studio north of Manistee. The studio is built into a sand dune and surrounded by pine trees.

Judy Jashinsky is the owner and came with the idea to start the residency.

Paul Britten designed the new player entry tunnel for the Denver Broncos.
Denver Broncos

It’s gameday in Denver.

Before the Broncos start playing football, players are announced as they sprint onto the field through a smoke-filled tunnel shaped like three wild, galloping horses.


"Lost Lexicon" is a collection of poetry by Holly Wren Spaulding. The collection consists of 20 poems who's titles are taken from words deleted by the "Oxford Junior Dictionary."
Dan Wanschura

The "Oxford Junior Dictionary" is aimed at kids seven and up. It’s not meant to be a comprehensive book – that’s why it has a limited space for word entries.

So, when the publishers added words like "analog," "broadband" and "chatroom" – other words like "ash," "beech" and "crocus" got the boot.

Karen Anderson has been writing weekly essays for IPR for 10 years. Her new book, "Gradual Clearing" is a collection of 120 of those essays.
Windborne Studios

For the last 10 years, Karen Anderson has been writing weekly essays heard on Interlochen Public Radio.

The essays are vivid, personal, and relatable. Karen takes time to notice the little details and experiences of everyday life.

Rufus Snoddy says being apart of Art Miami is one of the biggest opportunities in his career.
Dan Wanschura

Next week, Traverse City artist Rufus Snoddy goes to the Super Bowl of the modern art world.

“This is one of the best opportunities I’ve had in my life,” he says.

Rufus is a part of Miami Art Week. It brings galleries and high-end collectors from all over the world to south Florida.

Rebecca Reynolds and Jim Carpenter recently released their second podcast series about Charles Manson, called "Young Charlie." They say despite the brutal details of the murders covered in the show, it's a story that needs to be told.
Dan Wanschura

Take a look at a list of top podcasts today and one thing is very clear: murder is big.

Podcasts like “Dirty John,” “Someone Knows Something,” and a show from ABC News called “A Killing on the Cape,” often focus on the graphic details of murder. Currently, they rank higher on iTunes than shows like “Fresh Air,” “Radiolab” and “The Ted Radio Hour.”

"Birds Eye View - Leland, Mich." reads the caption from one of Edward Beebe's photo postcards.
Matt Mikus

Edward Beebe was a popular photographer in northern Michigan in the early 1900s. He created postcards with his photos but often deceived people regarding the location of the shots.

“I think a lot of these cards were intended to take advantage of tourists and visitors,” says local author Jack Hobey.


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