New Release of the Week

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Each week, Classical IPR showcases a recent release that we think our listeners will enjoy. Stay up to date on the latest classical albums of interest. 

New technical advances in the clarinet in the late 18th century improved its sound greatly, which in turn made it popular with composers and orchestras. The music on Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week celebrates the rise of the instrument with three different concertos for two clarinets. The album is called “Double Clarinet Concertos.”

 

Teresa Tam Studio

Classical IPR's New Release of the Week is "Entrez, le diable! The Virtuoso Cello at the Concert Spirituel." The album features Baroque cellist Juliana Soltis performing some of the first music written in France for the solo cello.

 During the 1730s, the cello began to be used as a solo instrument for the first time in France. The new album “Entrez, le Diable! The Virtuoso Cello at the Concert Spirituel” celebrates some of the early music for solo cello that audiences found both enthralling and a little scandalous.

 

Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week celebrates two milestones: the 90th anniversary of the Estonian National Symphony Orchestra and the 80th birthday of Neeme Jӓrvi, its principal conductor.

 

John Williams has scored over 100 films and has received more than 50 Academy Award nominations. Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops Orchestra feature an eclectic mix of Williams’s film music scores on their latest album “Lights, Camera...Music! Six Decades of John Williams.”

 

The Notos Piano Quartet performs chamber music from the late 19th and early 20th centuries on Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week. The album, called Hungarian Treasures, includes piano quartets by Hungarian composers Ernst von Dohnanyi and Bela Bartok and a string trio by Zoltan Kodaly.

requiemformymother.com

Stephen Edwards is best known for his work as a film composer. When his mother passed away in 2006, he composed a Requiem mass in her memory. “Requiem for My Mother” is now commercially available for the first time.

When his mother Rosalie Savarino Edwards passed away in 2006, composer Stephen Edwards composed a Requiem mass in her honor. The premiere recording of Edwards’s Requiem for My Mother is Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week.

 

 Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week features Natalie Dessay performing songs of Franz Schubert (1797-1828). This album is the first time Dessay has recorded Schubert’s music.

 

  This year marks the 40th season for the Emerson String Quartet. They are celebrating with a new album called “Chaconnes and Fantasias.”

 

The Hyperion label presents the first studio album by the pianist Luca Buratto. The album is named for the three pieces by Robert Schumann that appear on it: “Davidsbündlertänze, Humoreske & Blumenstück.”

  Chamber music of the Danish composer Niels W. Gade (1817-1890) is featured on Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week, “Niels W. Gade: Chamber Works, vol.

 “Lucrezia Borgia’s Daughter,” a new release from the Obsidian label, features motets that would have been composed and performed at the convent of Corpus Domini in Ferrara during the sixteenth century.

rachelbartonpine.com

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine just released her 35th album, "Bel canto Paganini." The centerpiece of the album is the 24 caprices for solo violin by Niccolo Paganini. Pine chatted with IPR's Amanda Sewell about the new album, what 19th-century opera composers thought about Paganini's music, and why Pine's young daughter is one of the only people who gets to hear her sing. Hear the entire conversation in the clip below.

Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week is the 35th album by violinist Rachel Barton Pine. The centerpiece of the album, “Bel Canto Paganini,” is Pine’s performance of Niccolò Paganini’s 24 caprices for solo violin.

 

  “Final Thoughts” is the newest release from Cedille Records. It features Jorge Federico Osorio performing the final solo piano works of Franz Schubert (1797-1828) and Johannes Brahms (1833-1897). A trailer for “Final Thoughts” can be viewed here.

 

  Sony Classical brings a new collection nearly 90 years in the making. “Arturo Toscanini: The Essential Recordings” is a 20-disc collection over a thousand minutes in length that celebrates the work of conductor Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957). The recordings in this collection were made for the RCA Victor label between 1929 and 1952. This compilation celebrates Toscanini’s 150th birthday and his over seven decades on the podium.

 

  Pentatone offers a new recording of three of Franz Joseph Haydn’s symphonies, numbers 53, 64 and 96.

 

  Pianist Mark Bebbington and the Somm label present The Piano Music of Ralph Vaughan Williams, a complete collection of Vaughan Williams’s compositions for solo and duo piano. Romanian-Nigerian pianist Rebeca Omordia joins Bebbington for the album’s two duo-piano selections.

 

Sir Arthur Sullivan is best-known for his full-length operettas composed with W.S. Gilbert, including “H.M.S. Pinafore” and “The Pirates of Penzance.” Sullivan’s prolific output also includes oratorios, ballets, incidental music and dozens of songs and hymns.

This year, Chandos released a new record celebrating Sullivan’s vast songbook. “Arthur Sullivan - Songs” brings together four of England’s rising classical music artists for an album of these rarely-performed pieces.

Violinist Daniel Hope’s new album, “For Seasons,” is inspired by the perennial Vivaldi concerto cycle known as The Four Seasons. Hope began learning the Vivaldi concertos at age seven, performing them live for the first time only six years later.

  Jeannette Sorrell and Apollo’s Fire bring us a new performance of J. S. Bach’s classic oratorio, St. John Passion. Apollo’s Fire performed the oratorio in March as a live theatrical performance in both Apollo’s Fire’s native Cleveland and New York City; now, the ensemble offers the performance as a two-disc album with accompanying photos and online resources.

 

  Legendary pianist Menahem Pressler joins forces with the Pacifica Quartet on the new album Brahms Piano Quintet/ Schumann String Quartet No. 1.

 

The Finnish composer Jean Sibelius is best known by classical music listeners for his orchestral works, including several symphonies and the famous tone poem “Finlandia.” But Sibelius’s vast output also includes nearly 100 songs.

 

Buxton Orr (1924-1997) studied medicine until he changed careers in the 1950s and began studying music composition with Benjamin Frankel. Some of his earliest compositions were film scores, and he also wrote songs, chamber music, operas, and musical theater pieces. Recently, Orr’s widow gave tenor Nicky Spence access to several of her husband’s songs that had never before been recorded.

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