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Interlochen Public Radio connects you to the stories, people and places of northern Michigan.

Radio Diaries: Uneventfulness

Jan 2, 2017

Several years ago, I heard a woman give a talk about a trip to Greenland where she lived with the Inuit people, traveled by dog sled, ate raw seal meat.  It wasn’t the kind of vacation most of us would choose—but for her, it was life-changing.

Not as a triumph of endurance but because she learned so much from the Inuit.  “They are peaceful,” she said.  “And they don’t talk much, only when necessary.  There is no personal ownership; they share everything.”  The list of what she learned was long but the one that struck me was this:  “The Inuit strive for a life of uneventfulness.”

National Writers Series: An evening with Ann Patchett

Dec 30, 2016

Ann Patchett is the author of novels such as "Bel Canto," "State of Wonder," and "The Patron Saint of Liars." Her new novel "Commonwealth" draws heavily on the experiences of her life. The narrative shifts back and forth from past to present, and from California to Virginia--the Commonwealth of the title. Patchett talks this hour with actor and writer Benjamin Busch. He asks Patchett why her books haven't been made into movies.

Radio Diaries: Tell Me About

Dec 27, 2016

My mother loved Christmas.  The decorating began early and covered every available surface—holly on the banister, stockings on the mantel, candles on the tables.  My father used to joke that the electric bill went down because we lit the house with candles.

She baked, too, and I helped.  First, there were little loaves of cranberry and pumpkin bread, plus little fruitcakes, which we gave as gifts.  Next were the endless batches of sugar cookies cut into stars, reindeer, snowmen, Santas—and elaborately decorated.  I made myself sick on frosting.

Adler family

Seventy five years ago this month, the United States declared war on Germany during World War II. That declaration had a dramatic impact on a Jewish family living in Austria and their family members who escaped the Holocaust and settled in Traverse City.

 


It's Winter Solstice this week, at 5: 44 am Wednesday, December 21st, when the Sun reaches the point furthest below the celestial equator and there is a deep inner pause in the yearly breathing process.

Radio Diaries: Smell of Soap

Dec 16, 2016

Now it’s likely that Neutrogena soap is still good for my skin, but I use it because of the smell—slightly medicinal and piney.  More than anything else, that familiar smell evokes my college years.

Leaning over one of the sinks in my dormitory bathroom, I would suds up my face, moving my fingers around in little circles like my mother taught me, rinsing thoroughly and patting the skin dry.  Then, in the unforgiving fluorescent light, I would examine my complexion for blemishes.

National Writers Series: An evening with Jodi Picoult

Dec 15, 2016

Jodi Picoult has written ten New York Times number one bestsellers, including her latest novel, "Small Great Things." It was inspired by the real-life experience of an African American nurse working at a Flint hospital, and deals with issues of prejudice, race, and justice. Picoult talks with Detroit News columnist Neal Rubin, who asked her when she knew that writing would work out as a career.

Old Mission Peninsula School - TCAPS Facebook page

Update 12/12/16: The board for Traverse City Area Public Schools votes to redistrict Old Mission Peninsula, sending public schools students on the peninsula to Eastern Elementary School in the fall of 2018. At that time, TCAPS will stop running Old Mission Peninsula School.

Public school students on Old Mission Peninsula will likely go to Eastern Elementary School beginning in fall 2018. Officials for Traverse City Area Public Schools could decide Monday whether to formally redistrict those students to Eastern Elementary School.

The Sky is Falling: This Week on The Storyteller's Night Sky

Dec 12, 2016

Despite another “Super Moon” and the Geminid Meteor Shower this week, I’d like to talk about the constellation Ursa Major, and its better-known asterism the Big Dipper.

Radio Diaries: Nature Was Unforgiving

Dec 9, 2016

On the last weekend in February, my husband and I went canoeing.  The sky was blue and the weatherman promised temperatures “in the forties.”  Spring was right around the corner, we said, but we couldn’t find the corner.

Instead, the two-track was drifted deep and Dick had to pull the canoe over snow for a mile down to the Betsie River.  The wind was strong out in the open marsh and we paddled hard against it.  “Doesn’t feel like the forties,” Dick said.

It’s December, which means it’s time for the annual discourse about whether or not there really was a Christmas Star, so here’s my “Storyteller’s Night Sky” perspective.  

Radio Diaries: Sentient Beings

Dec 2, 2016

A Native American wise man told me that they believe there are spirits in all things, in animals and trees and plants.  “We can commune with everything,” he said.

Then I heard a Buddhist speaker say that they believe there is awareness in all things. “We discover that everything is awake,” she said.

And I try to grasp how it might feel to live with the awareness that everything else has awareness?  That the chair I’m sitting on and the book I’m reading are alive in their own ways?

National Writers Series: An evening with Margaret Atwood

Dec 1, 2016

Margaret Atwood is the author of many bestselling novels such as "The Handmaid's Tale" and "Cat's Eye." Her latest books include "Hag-Seed," which is a retelling of Shakespeare's play "The Tempest," and "Angel Catbird," a graphic novel featuring a cat-bird superhero. Margaret Atwood starts off telling Doug Stanton more about how she came to write "Angel Catbird."

With the New Moon on Tuesday, November 29th, and the inner planets serving as the Moon's footpath, this will be a spectacular week of early evening stargazing.

The Moon is new Tuesday at 7:18 am, which means it might be possible to see the thin crescent as early as Wednesday evening, about 40 minutes after sunset. The Moon will be just to the right of the planet Mercury, and both of them will be very close to the horizon, in the west.

Morgan Springer

 

The administration and faculty at Northwestern Michigan College have finally reached a contract agreement. The agreement comes after more than a year and a half of tense negotiations.

Collective bargaining began when the faculty unionized in 2015. Bronwyn Jones, an instructor at NMC and a faculty representative in the negotiation process, says the faculty originally unionized in part because they felt left out of the college's decision-making processes and the faculty's relationship with administration was strained.

What sign are you? This week on The Storyteller's Night Sky

Nov 21, 2016

We’re drawing toward the end of November, which means that now, the signs of the zodiac start to get all mixed up.

Radio Diaries: Making a Statement

Nov 18, 2016

“Clogs are in this season,” a colleague said to me, “so you’re in fashion.”

“That’s always my goal,” I replied, thinking that I have probably never been in fashion and certainly not on purpose.  In fact, I wasn’t aware that I had bought clogs.  I picked out these slip-on shoes because they were comfortable.

This all happened a while ago now but for a brief time, my feet were stylish.  As for the rest of me, well...  “It’s the L.L. Bean look,” I say if called upon to identify my philosophy of fashion.  I’m not called upon often.

You've undoubtedly heard the November Full Moon referred to as the "super moon", because it is the closest Full Moon to Earth in nearly 70 years. But what does that mean?

The Moon's orbit around the Earth is not a circle, it's an ellipse, which means the Moon-Earth distance is always changing.

The technical name for the Moon closest to Earth is "perigee Moon". A perigee Moon can be 50,000 km closer than an apogee Moon, which is the Moon furthest away from us. 

Interlochen Public Radio

Voter turnout in northern Michigan on Tuesday was the highest it has been in at least two decades and Republican voters dominated the election up north. Donald Trump won every county but Marquette and Republican Jack Bergman won a resounding victory in the race for U.S. Congress.

Bergman won Michigan’s 1st Congressional seat by more than 55,000 votes over his Democratic opponent Lon Johnson. In 2012, this race—between different major party candidates—was decided by less than 2,000 votes.

Sam Cordon

For presidential race results go to NPR's election page for detailed information.

For more state election information visit Michigan's Secretary of State website.

U.S. 1st Congressional District:

Radio Diaries: Live Music

Nov 7, 2016

After camping for three days in the rain, we decided to go into town for supper.  The town was Munising, in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, and the restaurant was the Falling Rock Café & Bookstore.  All we wanted was a dry place and some good food.

The bonus was live music!  A dozen gray-haired musicians were sitting in the front window of the funky, high-ceilinged old building—playing their hearts out.  Fiddles, guitars, mandolin, dulcimer, bass, ukulele, piano.  Scottish, Irish and Celtic tunes—one after another while we tapped our feet and ate our sandwiches.

There’s a convergence of things taking place this week on Friday, when 11.11 rolls around on the calendar, and did you know that there was a time when 11.11 marked a celebration of religious and military cooperation.

Munson Healthcare

Munson Medical Center in Traverse City hopes to get city approval for a tall building before voters decide Proposal 3 Tuesday. Prop 3 would subject any building over 60 feet tall to a public vote.

Munson’s plans have become an issue in the public debate over Prop 3. Opponents of the proposal have pointed out that the proposal, which started with a dispute over a tall building in the downtown area, could impact the ability of the region’s medical center to develop.

National Writers Series: An evening with David Maraniss

Nov 3, 2016

Pulitzer-prize winning journalist David Maraniss says he was inspired to write his latest book after watching a now-iconic Chrysler commercial. David Maraniss was born in Detroit and is now an associate editor at the Washington Post. He’s written biographies of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Vince Lombardi, Roberto Clemente, and others. His newest book, “Once in a Great City,” traces the heyday of Detroit and its decline. He talks with fellow journalist John U. Bacon. David Maraniss starts out explaining more about how he decided to write “Once in a Great City.”

We’re at the bitter end of the campaign season, and it’s easy to feel like turning on the news is a bit like opening Pandora’s box~so I want to see if this is a valid analogy to make, given what’s happening in the sky right now.

In classical Greek Mythology, Pandora is the first woman to be created, and her name means: She who receives gifts from all the gods.

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