Classical New Releases

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Classical IPR regularly features new releases that we think our listeners will enjoy. Stay up to date on the latest classical albums of interest. 

Pianist Evgeny Kissin has just released a long-awaited solo album. “Evgeny Kissin: Beethoven” is the pianist’s first solo album in over ten years. It is also his first album dedicated entirely to the solo piano works of Ludwig van Beethoven.

 

What does it take to be an opera superstar? Jonas Kaufmann should know. He's been called "the world's greatest tenor."

Kaufmann has the voice. He's also got the onstage charisma, the movie-star good looks, the ambition, even a little controversy — and a brand new album.

He's the ultimate singer-songwriter: His poetry knows no equal and, as a musician, his powers are magical. But he also has big problems.

The tragic story of Orpheus has inspired countless works of art over the millennia — plus one. The latest retelling comes from director and choreographer Mark DeChiazza.

 Giacomo Puccini is best known for his many operas, including Madama Butterfly, La boheme, Tosca and Turandot. Classical IPR’s Featured New Release shows a previously unknown musical side of Puccini: his work as an organist. The album is called Giacomo Puccini: Organ Works.

 

David Finlayson / Teresa Berg

Brothers Anthony and Demarre McGill both have successful careers as orchestral musicians. Anthony McGill is the principal clarinetist with the New York Philharmonic, and Demarre McGill is the principal flutist with the Seattle Symphony.

 

The McGill brothers, along with pianist Michael McHale, have released a new album on the Chicago-based label Cedille. The album is called "Portraits," and it features several world premieres. It’s also the first album the brothers have recorded together.

 

Classical IPR’s Featured New Release includes three world premiere recordings and a guest appearance by an Academy Award-winning actor. The McGill/McHale Trio’s new album on the Cedille label is called Portraits.

 

Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week is an album that celebrates the woman who created the link between Johann Sebastian Bach and Felix Mendelssohn. The album is called In Sara Levy’s Salon.

 

J. Henry Fair

Grammy Award-winning guitarist Sharon Isbin has a new album called "Alma Española." On the new album, Isbin and mezzo soprano Isabel Leonard perform Spanish-language art songs, many of which are new arrangements Isbin created.

The intrepid pianist Marc-André Hamelin has a reputation for embracing the toughest, strangest music. His new recording of For Bunita Marcus by Morton Feldman is a fine example. For nearly 75 minutes the music never rises above a whisper and the damper pedal is always pressed down, allowing single notes to ring out into vast, silent spaces.

Mezzo soprano Isabel Leonard and guitarist Sharon Isbin have a new album on Bridge Records called Alma Española. The album features art songs by Spanish composers including Manuel de Falla and Federico Garcia Lorca.

 

 Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week features familiar music in a new and surprising interpretation. Marimbist Kuniko performs her own arrangements of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach in Bach: Solo Works for Marimba.

 

  On June 10 of this year, Yekwon Sunwoo became the 2017 gold medalist at the Fifteenth Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. A new album featuring Sunwoo’s performances from the competition is Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week.

 

New technical advances in the clarinet in the late 18th century improved its sound greatly, which in turn made it popular with composers and orchestras. The music on Classical IPR’s New Release of the Week celebrates the rise of the instrument with three different concertos for two clarinets. The album is called “Double Clarinet Concertos.”

 

Teresa Tam Studio

Classical IPR's New Release of the Week is "Entrez, le diable! The Virtuoso Cello at the Concert Spirituel." The album features Baroque cellist Juliana Soltis performing some of the first music written in France for the solo cello.

 During the 1730s, the cello began to be used as a solo instrument for the first time in France. The new album “Entrez, le Diable! The Virtuoso Cello at the Concert Spirituel” celebrates some of the early music for solo cello that audiences found both enthralling and a little scandalous.

 

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