Arts at Interlochen

Interlochen Center for the Arts has arts education programs for students in grades 3-12 and adults. Interlochen also hosts hundreds of concerts and events in northern Michigan and is the parent organization of our two public radio stations.

Find the stories and sounds of Interlochen below, or click here for recordings of Interlochen student performances. 

Jeremy Kittel is a seriously well rounded violinist and musician; he’s a master of classical, jazz, Scottish and Irish fiddle, Bluegrass… you name it, he does it!

Jeremy recently came to Interlochen Arts Academy to work with some students before a Valentine’s concert in Suttons Bay, and brought his bandmates Joshua Pinkham (mandolin) and Quinn Bachand (guitar) with him to Studio A.
(Learn more about the band, and our Studio A visit, by clicking "Read More.")

Interlochen Center for the Arts

When artists listen to the heart, they’re usually looking for emotion or inspiration. No stethoscope necessary – certainly not an echo machine. Until now.

Students at the Interlochen Arts Academy have been jammin’ along to the beats of their own hearts, thanks to some pretty sophisticated medical equipment. Next week they’re putting on a show that blends the traditional artist’s notion of heartache with a very physical representation of their healthy, and normal, teenage hearts.

  Find the webcast link and other show information here.

Hitting the stage

    

    

Chris Hintz

The Chinese economy and its rapid expansion is a wonder of the modern world. But its ugly side drives the story in Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig’s new play.

"The World of Extreme Happiness" opens in New York next month. It’s a dark comedy about the hopes of rural migrants in China whose dreams look rather American.

The hero of the drama, 19-year old Sunny, works as a janitor and wants a promotion. She meets an older worker who explains the power of positive thinking.

Interlochen Arts Academy Alumnus Keith Buncke has just been named Principal Bassoon of the famed Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

When Buncke graduated from Interlochen, he probably assumed he’d take a few years to finish college and begin a career. That was not to be: not long into his studies at the Curtis Institute of Music, Buncke, then 20 years old, was selected as First Bassoonist for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra.

Now, at 21, Buncke embarks on his new adventure under the baton of Riccardo Muti in Chicago.

Toi toi toi, Keith!

Radio Collage: Our own "Studio A-list"

Jan 17, 2015
The view from behind the microphone
Tim Burke

  This month, Radio Collage dips into our vault for several of what you could call our very own "A-list"...student performances from IPR's "Live from Studio A" series.  We'll be revisiting sessions from the past five years for music of Debussy, Boccherini, Mendelssohn and Chopin, along with works from some not-so-familiar composers!

Luke Ratray

Contemporary classical music sometimes gets a bad rap – from both classical music purists and a broader audience not used to music that doesn’t always follow a melody. But among the genre’s fans, eighth blackbird is considered a fearless and innovative ensemble. They’ve been rewarded with three Grammy awards.

The six members of eighth blackbird came together at Oberlin Conservatory in 1996. A couple of its members have changed over the years but the group’s focus on exploring musical boundaries has not.

Sounds of the Season

Dec 23, 2014

  Interlochen Arts Academy Symphonic Band and Choir join forces for a concert full of thrilling music for the holidays.  There's plenty here that will move and inspire you, and room for some fun, too! Hosted by IPR's Kate Botello.

Listen online, or at 4:00PM on Christmas Day on Classical IPR. Find our complete lineup of holiday favorites here.


francine j. harris

Award-winning poet francine j. harris says her writing life began in high school, when she started a kind of conversation with her best friend.

Harris says one day her friend asked if she could read a poem she'd written – something she had never done before.

"And it was so weird because I didn't recognize her in it," Harris says.

But it made Harris want to write. She says she called her friend the next day and read her something that she wrote.

"We started doing this back and forth."

Listen to Harris read  "The Fat of the Fog Hovers Over," which she says she wrote about Traverse City.


Last December, the Mash-Up Rock and Roll Musical Parody group staged an unusual performance. The Grinch (who stole Christmas) was cast into the lead role of the 1969 rock opera “Tommy.”

The parody team is back this year weaving together fairy tales with 1980s rock.

The idea came to Lesley Tye more than a year ago when she was in her car listening to the song “Girlfriend in a Coma.” That was a hit from 1987 by The Smiths. The song got Tye thinking about Snow White and the prince who saves her.

Radio Collage: Variety is the Spice...

Nov 25, 2014

  Interlochen students have a little something for just about everyone in this edition of Radio Collage... a student clarinet quartet gives us its take on a Hungarian Dance, the Academy Percussion Ensemble performs a work by Pat Metheny and Lyle Mays, and a pianist from the Summer Piano Institute tells us the "back story" on a Rachmaninoff Etude.  We'll also hear some Spirituals, a Brass Sextet, and original works by students from the Creative Writing and Singer-Songwriter programs at Interlochen. 


Donald Dietz / Detroit Symphony Orchestra

The Detroit Symphony Orchestra celebrates a first this weekend: It will perform an original piece by its very own music director, Grammy-winner Leonard Slatkin.  

"The subtitle is concertino grosso, so already one can sense that there's humor in this: a concertino usually being thought of as being a small concerto, and grosso meaning large," he says.

Familiar music with a twist

Nov 19, 2014

Radio Collage airs this weekend (Saturday at 8:06am, and Sunday at 7pm). Among the works on the program, this familiar Hungarian Dance by Brahms performed by the S.M.T.S clarinet quartet.

U-W Madison School of Music

A good meal can become a great meal if the restaurant has the right ambiance. That’s what chefs say at least. Good music, for example, can improve the experience of eating.

But what about the other way around? Can good food improve the experience of listening to good music?

An Interlochen conductor and a chef are teaming up in Traverse City to find out.

You've probably listened to some tunes while making dinner - but how often have you based the menu directly on the music? IAA Band Conductor Dr. Matthew Schlomer and Black Star Farms Chef Jonathan Dayton put their heads together for an innovative project that does just that.

"Tone to Table," a collaboration between Interlochen Arts Academy and Black Star Farms, is an upcoming event exploring the connections between food and music - compositional "ingredients" taking on new depth as they relate to one another.

Chef Dayton, along with Black Star's Stephanie Lee Wiitala, came together with Dr. Schlomer to create an event based on the interplay of music and food. On November 20th, diners can experience that exchange, with music provided by IAA, and food by Black Star Farms. The menu has a, "Landscapes," theme, and follows many layers of that idea - everything from outdoor landscapes to landscapes within - what Dr. Schlomer calls, "ideal urges," and, "primal urges."

We were treated to a performance and discussion of those, "primal urges," in Studio A. IAA Flute Instructor Nancy Stagnitta was the soloist, with a group of IAA percussion students (Joshua Pearlmutter, Stephen Karukas, Adriano Macciocchi and Miyu Morita), performing samples of Andre Jolivet's, "Suite en Concert." The piece is based on ancient sounds and ideas - flute and drum are the oldest musical instruments known to man. Chef Dayton discussed how the primal sound and differing textures influenced his dish, from ingredients to  plating.

It was a fun, interesting discussion (we even talked about how Chef Dayton changed a sauce because it was too, "creamy," for its accompanying composition), interspersed with fascinating music, but be warned: it might make you hungry!


Interlochen students honor veterans

Nov 11, 2014
Terri McCarthy

The Interlochen Center for the Arts marked Veterans Day with a special tribute.

Student trumpeters began playing taps across Interlochen’s campus at 11 a.m. exactly. It’s a tribute to veterans that began more than 10 years ago.

Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

When leaders at the Interlochen Center for the Arts scheduled a visit by Poet Terrance Hayes, they had no idea he would be coming to campus as one of the latest winners of the MacArthur "Genius Grants." 

NPR featured Hayes on All Things Considered after winning the award last month. 

Ross Halfin

  Songwriter Loudon Wainwright III has been traveling the world with his brand of witty – and sometimes weird – music for over forty years.

Friday night, he brings his show to the Interlochen Center for the Arts.

If you don’t know Wainwright’s music, you may know him from his acting appearances as “the Singing Surgeon” on the TV show "M*A*S*H" or as a disappearing doctor from the hit film “Knocked Up.”

IPR's Aaron Selbig spoke with Wainwright about his side career as a comedic actor and his new album – “Haven’t Got the Blues (Yet).”

"What I Did this Summer"

Sep 26, 2014

  When many of us were younger, Fall meant back to school, and writing a theme about how we spent the summer.  This month on Radio Collage, we turn the tables:  it's the teachers who'll be "writing the theme", or in this case, performing. We'll hear music of Beethoven, Debussy and Mozart, along with lesser known composers like Bill Potts and Pierre-Max Duboix.  As an added treat, we'll be listening to some unusual arrangements and ensembles.


  This edition of Radio Collage features excerpts from the 2014 Interlochen Arts Camp "Collage" show, along with performances recorded at a few of the other concerts that take place during the Camp.  There's music by Mendelssohn, Duke Ellington and Brahms, a bit of Shakespeare, and original works by students from the Singer/Songwriter and Creative Writing programs.

  For this Radio Collage, we revisit performances from the recently completed Interlochen Arts Academy year.  There's lots of diversity, with music by Maurice Ravel, Sir Arthur Sullivan, and Dave Brubeck.  We'll also hear works by students from the Comparative Arts, Creative Writing and Singer-Songwriter programs.

  

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