Growing your own business means persisting past uncertainty and rejection: having a clear idea of what your product is about, and where you want to take your business.

Detroiter Melissa Butler is proof of that idea. She’s the founder and CEO of The Lip Bar. It is a non-toxic, cruelty-free and vegan line of lipsticks and lip-glosses.

The Trump administration has rolled out its plan to respond to violence and guns in our schools. It wants to provide firearms training to some teachers. But it has backed off on making major changes to gun legislation: For example, there’s nothing about raising the minimum age to buy guns from 18 to 21.


March Madness is upon us now that the NCAA has announced its 68-team field. Let those who love college hoops plunge into making their brackets. 

Kirk Steudle, director of the Michigan Department of Transportation recently joined Stateside to answer your questions about our roads.

It turns out, you had a lot of questions.



New information has come to light about the way the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality handled an important warning on possible toxic chemical contamination of groundwater in Belmont, in west Michigan. 

Things don't always fit together neatly. Life would be really boring if they did.

That's the driving idea behind a new podcast called Mismatch – "stories of the incompatible, the unsuitable, and the out-of-step."

The podcast will air during Stateside’s normal time slot (3-4 p.m. and 10-11 p.m.) on Monday, Feb. 26 and on Tuesday, Feb. 27.

For a while, the show Hoarders was popular on cable.

A show about people who just can’t stop hoarding things in their homes. Bathrooms, kitchens, living rooms are piled high with paper, dishes, clothes, food. Doors can’t open. Sometimes there are too many animals in the house. People with hoarding disorder put themselves – and sometimes others – in danger.

The TV show resolves the issue with a lot of drama and tears, and the problem, at least what the viewer sees, is all taken care of in one or two episodes.

But life doesn’t work that way, and for a long time, there just wasn’t a lot of help available for people with hoarding disorder.

Perhaps it’s already spread to your corner of Michigan: those aggravating, irritating, nauseating and much repeated political advertisements. Yup, yet another election year.

And with five people on the U.S. Supreme Court declaring a stack of cold, hard cash is not money but free speech, we Michiganeers are about to get an ear and eye-full for the duration of 2018.

Consumers Energy wants to stop buying renewable energy from outside sources.

Under the federal Public Utilities Regulator Policy Act (PURPA), state regulators can encourage more renewable energy by requiring utilities to purchase electricity generated by solar, wind, biomass, or other renewable sources at the same rate it would cost the utility to make it.

That helps Michigan to be less dependent on fossil fuels, and supports development of renewable energy sources.

Laura Checkoway just finished a film that is now being nominated for an Oscar. She’s the director, producer, and editor of a film called Edith+Eddie. It’s up for Best Documentary (Short Subject). She is from Ann Arbor.

Checkoway joined Stateside to discuss how she learned about Edith and Eddie, who at 96 and 95 are America’s oldest interracial newlyweds, how her film comments on America’s system of elder care, and what it feels like to receive an Oscar nomination.

Earlier this week, Stateside spoke to Wayne County Executive Warren Evans and Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners Chair Andy LaBarre about their counties’ consideration of a transit plan that would include links between Ann Arbor and downtown Detroit.

Macomb and Oakland county leaders appeared to distance themselves from supporting a ballot proposal for a four county regional transit system.

Lawyers for wrongfully convicted ex-prisoners are crying foul over the dismissal of their clients claims on the grounds of a missed deadline that they dispute.

The exonerated former inmates are seeking damages under the recent Wrongful Imprisonment Compensation Act. The 2016 law is intended to compensate people for the years they were wrongly imprisoned.

Gabi Silver represents one of the ex-prisoners, Konrad Montgomery, who spent more than three years in prison for a crime he did not commit. 

Retirement accounts, specifically 401(k) plans, were never intended to be a substitute for a pension. But, the reality is, most people, if they have a retirement account at all, it’s a 401(k). Last year, the Wall Street Journal ran a piece in which the creators of the 401(k) worry about what they started. The 401(k) was designed to supplement income from Social Security and a pension.


Michigan Radio is partnering with Bridge Magazine's Truth Squad project this year, as we have for each election year during the past eight years, to fact check political claims.

This time, we're looking at gubernatorial candidates.

Lake Superior, the largest freshwater lake in the world, is awe-inspiring on many levels. But it’s also challenged. Though it seems pristine, a couple centuries of exploitation have taken their toll.

A new book Sustaining Lake Superior: An Extraordinary Lake in a Changing Worldpublished by Yale University Press, traces the history of the lake and some of the indignities it's suffered at the hands of humans.

The Next Idea


In late November of 2014, Michigan Radio’s Stateside began a series called The Next Idea. With support from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and a team that included the University of Michigan’s “Dean of Innovation” Jeff DeGraff and Executive Producer Joe Linstroth, the project’s mission was to focus on innovation, creativity and ideas meant to move Michigan forward.


In essays and interviews, we met Michigan inventors and entrepreneurs, teachers, artists, scientists, farmers, business people, experts, and just regular citizens who decided to think outside the box to make their state and their communities better.

If you’ve been watching the Winter Olympics in South Korea, there’s a pretty good chance you’ve seen the product of a Michigan company.

The snow on the ski slopes is manufactured snow — fake snow — made by Snow Makers Incorporated based in Midland.

At one point, it appeared the leaders of Oakland, Macomb, Washtenaw, and Wayne counties, along with the city of Detroit, were on their way to supporting a ballot proposal this fall for a regional mass transit plan.

That got derailed when the county executives in Oakland and Macomb distanced themselves from the plan.



A lot of Michigan residents might know that Malcolm X grew up in this state, but beyond that, the facts might get a little fuzzy. 



Michigan History Center’s Rachel Clark joined Stateside to bring some clarity to that history.

Governor Rick Snyder has suggested Michigan should restructure the state’s juvenile justice system. However, little has been done.

Paul Elam, president of Public Policy Associates and an advocate for juvenile justice, recently wrote an opinion piece in Bridge Magazine, which indicated the youth in the juvenile justice system don’t have the luxury of time.

There is a child care shortage. That’s not going to be a surprise to many families, especially those in rural areas.

In a recent Dome Magazine article, Ken Winter outlined the problem in northern Michigan. It’s bad enough that the chambers of commerce in the region are making it a priority issue.

This month a lot of people in Jackson County were shocked by accusations that their sheriff, Steven Rand, is a “multi-faceted bigot.” 

That was among a number of complaints in a federal lawsuit filed against the sheriff.

The Sheriff has apologized for his comments, but yesterday the Jackson County Board called for his resignation and added that if he doesn’t resign, then the governor should remove him. 

Mass shootings, like the one last week in Florida, can leave some people feeling nervous.

While mass shootings don’t happen every day, car accidents and industrial accidents do. With all that in mind, hospitals around the country are putting on free workshops to teach people how to prevent someone from bleeding to death.

For six years now, the Detroit Unity Temple has held a quilt exhibit in February. Many of the quilts – but not all – are tributes to African-American history. This year a quilt that’s getting a lot of attention is called “Strange Fruit."

Each month, we take a listen to new music from Detroit-area artists.

This time, the theme is "anticipation." After some four years, Black Milk, Jack White, and Andrew W.K. are set to release new albums.