michigan photography

"Birds Eye View - Leland, Mich." reads the caption from one of Edward Beebe's photo postcards.
Matt Mikus

Edward Beebe was a popular photographer in northern Michigan in the early 1900s. He created postcards with his photos but often deceived people regarding the location of the shots.

“I think a lot of these cards were intended to take advantage of tourists and visitors,” says local author Jack Hobey.


Photographer John Robert Williams shows a portrait he took of Gov. William Milliken. Williams recently donated his film collection to the Traverse Area District Library.
Dan Wanschura

John Robert Williams has been a professional photographer in Northern Michigan for over 40 years.

Recently, he donated his film collection to the Traverse Area District Library. It includes portraits of people, scenic landscapes, fine art shots, architecture, and much more.

 

 


The Grand Haven lighthouse and waves get a good dose of what Todd and Brad Reed call, "magic light."
Todd and Brad Reed Photography

A version of this piece originally aired in November 2015

Nature photographers are a special breed.

To get the perfect shot, they’re willing to go out in all sorts of weather conditions— even gale-force rain storms.

Todd and Brad Reed are familiar with braving harsh weather conditions. The father-son team owns a photo gallery in Ludington, and have a reputation for capturing nature’s beauty in all it's different phases. Recently, their work was featured in the fall issue of Outdoor Photographer magazine. 

The Reeds say a lot of their success comes from having a game-plan in place, before they ever step foot outside. Brad calls it previsualization.

“Laying in bed the night before a storm when we can’t sleep, we’re thinking about where on the beach is going to be a good spot,” Brad says. “We’re building pictures in our head. That makes us much more efficient when we get out and we’re doing the actual shooting.”


John Robert Williams converted an old elementary school gym into his new studio.
John Robert Williams Photography

John Robert Williams is a photographer with an eye for potential. 

When he moved out of his downtown Traverse City studio last year, and into an old elementary school gymnasium, he began dreaming of all the different ways he could use the space. Where most people would probably see a big, mostly empty room, Williams sees a studio full of potential.

“I lie awake at night thinking of cool new things and shots I can do,” says Williams.


Todd and Brad Reed Photography

Sara Kassien is not a photographer. She was in the right place though on Sunday, August 2nd, driving home from work when the storm that had wrecked Glen Arbor swept over Traverse City.

“I saw all these other people pulled over,” she remembers. “I’m like, ‘That’s a good idea, I should do that.’ I followed the crowd.”


Ryan Spencer Reed

Ryan Spencer Reed is a photographer from Ludington whose work falls into the category of “social documentary.”

In 2011, Reed entered the Grand Rapids ArtPrize with a collection of photographs documenting the human tragedy of civil war and genocide in Darfur and South Sudan.

This year, Reed is back at ArtPrize, this time with photos he took while embedded with the U.S. Army in Afghanistan.

IPR’s Aaron Selbig asked Reed how he managed to get the OK from the Army to tag along with the 101st Airborne Division in a war zone.  

New Book By Father-Son Photographers

Feb 12, 2014

Every Tuesday in the year 2012, Todd and Brad Reed were on the road. The father-son photographers from Ludington traveled all around Michigan to take pictures. And they compiled those pictures in a 400-page book titled "Tuesdays." The images are colorful shots of crashing waves, sandy beaches, fishermen and lighthouses. There are even some aerial shots and some black-and-white photos, too. Brad Reed says picking Tuesdays to take photographs was a practical choice.