Classical Music

The latest in Classical music from Interlochen Public Radio. You'll find concert recordings, live performances from our very own Studio A, Classical music for kids and so much more. 

Welcome to Episode 31 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! Coming up - tunes for TV! And - speaking of TV, if you missed the Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade broadcast, never fear! We’ll highlight the Broadway shows featured this year. At Intermission, we’ll talk with director Donna Drake. She’ll tell us the story of how she came to be one of the original cast members of A CHORUS LINE. In Act Two, we’ll answer last week’s trivia question and give you a new one to peruse.

Click through for this week's playlist!


Take a look at our holiday mailer, featuring our on-air schedule of programming during this holiday season!

 

 

Chris Thile is living his childhood dream. At the age of two he asked for a mandolin; by age five, he was taking lessons; as a teenager, he mastered every song on Bela Fleck and the Flecktones’ album.

Thile and banjoist Fleck performed together for the first time at a bluegrass festival when Thile was 14. Since that day, the duo has collaborated countless times, culminating with a weeklong duo tour this summer. “It’s remarkably comfortable for us to play together,” Fleck said.

The duo stopped by Studio A this summer to chat with host Aaron Selbig about their unlikely paths to stardom and the unique “musical dialect” that connects them.

 

 


Classical music observers say we're living in a golden age of string quartets. It's hard to disagree when you hear the vibrant young players in New York's Attacca Quartet.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify playlist at the bottom of the page.

 

Richard Goode knows Ludwig van Beethoven better than most living people.

Heralded as “one of today’s leading interpreters of classical and romantic music,” pianist Richard Goode is one of only a handful of pianists to complete the project of recording all 32 of Beethoven’s piano sonatas. “You get to know them almost as people,” Goode said of the sonatas. Through the sonatas, Goode has also gotten a glimpse into Beethoven himself.

Goode joined IPR in Studio A for a discussion about what Beethoven means to the musical world—and to him personally.

 


Welcome to Episode 30 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! Coming up: three early hits for legendary combo Lerner and Loewe. Then, we’ll hear from shows running right now. At Intermission, a tribute to the late, great, Elaine Stritch. In Act Two, we’ll hear some new renditions of evergreen songs from THE WIZARD OF OZ.

Click through for this week's playlist!


Joyce DiDonato is one of the most acclaimed opera singers of her generation; this year, she won the Grammy for Best Classical Vocal Solo. Her latest album, In War and Peace: Harmony Through Music, is a collection of baroque arias from the 17th and 18th centuries divided into two sections — one addressing war, the other, peace.

The Italian pianist and composer Ludovico Einaudi brought in a full band for a stunning live performance. He has a giant global following — and for good reason, as demonstrated by this rendition of his piece "Petricor."

SET LIST

  • "Petricor"

Photo: Larry Hirshowitz/KCRW. Watch Ludovico Einaudi's full Morning Becomes Eclectic set at KCRW.com.

Calling themselves "an accidental brass quartet," the members of The Westerlies, like the prevailing winds, blew east to New York from their hometown of Seattle, where they were childhood friends.

Jazz great Wynton Marsalis, a virtuoso trumpet player and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, has written — wait for it — a violin concerto.

As the daughter of the late virtuoso violinist Roman Totenberg, I was intrigued and wanted to know more. So I spent an hour with Marsalis — and the violinist he wrote his concerto with and for. (More on that later.)

Welcome to Episode 20 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello - and Happy Halloween! We highlight the spooky and the kooky of Broadway and beyond. At Intermission: Worst show ever, or best show ever? When it comes to DANCE OF THE VAMPIRES, Natalie Douglas isn't quite sure.

Click through for this week's playlist!


Do you believe in ghosts? The age-old question pops up this time of year when Halloween looms — the answer for opera composers seems to be a resounding "yes." Many of them, from Mozart to Corigliano, have given ghosts a few choice moments on stage. Operatic apparitions arrive suddenly in the middle of the night, crash dinner parties or do their ghostly duty simply by playing tricks on the minds of the living.

Some critics may say that jazz is becoming irrelevant.

Bill Sears knows better. Sears is the Director of Jazz Studies at Interlochen Arts Academy and has spent over 30 years as an educator and performer, playing alongside some of the biggest names in jazz. Raised on the big band music of his parents’ youth, Sears began playing jazz in 1968 and hasn’t stopped since. 

Sears sat down with Studio A host Kate Botello to discuss the communal nature of jazz, its importance in American culture and his calling to share jazz with the next generation.

  

Welcome to Episode 28 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! Coming up: foodies, take note. We’ve got a smorgasbord of food-related tunes coming your way. Then, some odes to the trials and joys of being alive. At Intermission, musical director Brian Nash stops by to tell us a story about a Broadway legend from one of his many fascinating gigs, and we’ll hear a cut from his album, Forever After.

Click through for this week's playlist and our featured video clip: Lauren Bacall goes wild!

What do you think of when you consider the harp? Angels, chords and soft strumming? These are exactly the stereotypes that Joan Holland, instructor of harp at Interlochen Arts Academy, hopes to correct.

“I want people to realize we’re also capable of playing melodies and great rhythms,” she said.

Holland shares the harp’s versatility, her musical inspirations, and her love of teaching with host Nancy Deneen in this installment of Studio A.


String quintet Sybarite5 is atypical in many ways.

The classically trained musicians do not limit their repertoire to the traditional works of the masters, but also embrace new music, extended techniques and popular rock tunes. Sybarite5’s five-player format and openness to experimentation make them one of the most flexible and dynamic ensembles in today’s instrumental music scene.

Studio A’s Kate Botello sat down with the ensemble to discuss new music and how they’ve forged a unique path in a traditional field.


In a season of relentless shouting, the best antidote might be singing. Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato's new album with conductor Maxim Emelyanychev and the ensemble Il Pomo d'Oro, In War & Peace: Harmony Through Music, uses Baroque arias to explore the pain and possibilities of these troubled times. A companion website invites anyone and everyone to answer the simple but loaded question, "In the midst of chaos, how do you find peace?"

Welcome to Episode 27 - the Season Three premiere of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! Tonight: neighbors, pesky and otherwise, and we’ll hear some songs about a hot button issue - the telephone. Then, a it’s a WICKED intermission! We’ll talk with the lovely Emily Koch, who just wrapped up her turn as Elphaba in the national tour of WICKED. In Act Two: feeling down? Need a boost to your self esteem? We’ve got you covered.

Click through for this week's playlist!

Need a moment to get away from it all? Here's your escape — a serene and bewitching video that calms the wearied mind.

Pages