Classical Music

The latest in Classical music from Interlochen Public Radio. You'll find concert recordings, live performances from our very own Studio A, Classical music for kids and so much more. 

Capital Public Radio

Join Classical IPR this St. Patrick's Day (Friday, March 17) at 6 PM for Irish Connections, a celebration of music from and inspired by Ireland. “There are only two kinds of people in the world,” goes the old saying, “The Irish, and those who wish they were.”

This program celebrates the Emerald Isle--from Purcell to Beethoven, from John Field to Victor Herbert.

A recent lawsuit brought by a blind theatergoer against the producers of the hit musical Hamilton has highlighted Broadway's spotty track record in serving audiences with disabilities.

In music, a coda is a passage that brings a musical composition to an end. This is the coda to a musical saga — the story of the Stradivarius violin that was stolen 37 years ago from my late father, violinist Roman Totenberg, and recovered in 2015.

That violin, made by Antonio Stradivari in 1734, was my father's "musical partner" for 38 years as he toured the world.

This Friday, March 17, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will feature performances by the concerto competition winners. Chea Young Kang, a senior from South Korea, visited IPR's Studio A recently for a performance and conversation.

Ms. Kang won the concerto competition singing “Una Voce Poco Fa” from Rossini’s opera The Barber of Seville. She sang the piece in IPR's Studio A. 

Photo by Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Rossini’s Guillaume Tell, heard in a performance from November 2016. Gerald Finley stars in the title role of the legendary Swiss patriot William Tell, which he has made a specialty of in recent seasons, with Marina Rebeka as the Austrian princess Mathilde, and Bryan Hymel as her suitor Arnold. The performance was led by Met Principal Conductor Fabio Luisi.

Listen LIVE on Classical IPR on Saturday, March 18 at 1pm ET.

This Friday, March 17, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will feature performances by the concerto competition winners. Ailun Zheng, a senior from Shanghai, visited IPR's Studio A recently for a performance and conversation.

 

Chandos, Sir Andrew Davis and the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra bring a landmark new collection by British composer Ralph Vaughan Williams.

 

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thanks to listeners in Cadillac, Higgins Lake, Ypsilanti, Irons, and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Philip Glass, Mad Rush; performed by the composer

2. Franz Joseph Haydn, Symphony no. 96, third movement; Christopher Hogwood/Academy of Ancient Music

3. Giuseppe Verdi, “Sempre libera” from La traviata; Maria Callas/Alfredo Kraus

4. Gustav Mahler, Symphony no. 4, excerpt of third movement; Leonard Bernstein/New York Philharmonic

5. John Lunn, main titles from Downton Abbey; Angèle Dubeau/La Pietà

Classical music writer Fran Hoepfner (@franhoepfner) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to recall her days as a young percussionist learning to play “Petrouchka,” the groundbreaking ballet music that Russian composer Igor Stravinsky wrote in 1911, and

Yesterday, on International Women's Day, most of my friends were in full empowerment mode. They were sporting red clothes, naming their top five women artists, and posting photos of mothers and daughters. But over in the jazz world, International Women's Day was a little more ... awkward. We were busy attending to some much less celebratory women's business, a series of online events that we'll call the Saga of Musical Clitoris.

Review: Jacaszek, 'KWIATY'

Mar 9, 2017

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify or Apple Music playlist at the bottom of the page.


Polish composer Michał Jacaszek's new album KWIATY, which translates as "flowers," strives to locate beauty in desolation. These aren't the kaleidoscopic gardens of Victorian manors. They're the dried petals inside old acrylic paperweights, their life cycles frozen in time.

prx.org

Celebrate International Women's Day on Wednesday, March 8 at 6 PM, when Classical IPR presents "I Am Woman, Hear Me Sing," a program about music written and performed by women. Produced by WFIU's Harmonia, the program explores the music of 16th-century Italian nun Raffaella Aleotti, the first nun to have her work published. Then, Trio Mediaeval goes to 13th-century England with their reconstruction of a Lady Mass.

Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Verdi’s La Traviata. Soprano Sonya Yoncheva reprises her widely praised interpretation of the heroine Violetta, with tenor Michael Fabiano as her lover Alfredo, and baritone Thomas Hampson as Alfredo’s protective father, Giorgio Germont. The performance is conducted by Nicola Luisotti, Music Director of the San Francisco Opera.

Listen LIVE on Classical IPR on Saturday, March 11 at 1pm ET.

LIBRETTO

Hailed by Opera Today for his “Puccinian fire power and dramatic heat to raise the hair on the back of your neck,” Lester Lynch has longed to record an album of traditional American spirituals since he began his career. Lynch’s newest album, On My Journey Now, is a dream come true. “Music speaks to and heals the human spirit,” writes Lynch in the album’s liner notes. “These songs have had a profound effect on American history.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thanks to listeners in Scottville, Wolverine, Cheboygan, Harbor Springs, and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Jamie Allen, arr.; Elephant Love Medley from Moulin Rouge; original motion picture soundtrack

2. Felix Mendelssohn; Octet for Strings, movements 3 & 4; Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble

3. Julius Fucik; Winter Storm Waltz; Vaclav Neumann/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra

4. Aaron Copland; Variations on a Shaker Hymn from Appalachian Spring; Leonard Slatkin, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra

Outside of show business, the presidency is one of the few jobs that comes with its own song.

In a tradition dating back to the 1800s, when the commander in chief enters the room, the U.S. Marine Band strikes up "Hail to the Chief."

Tune in to Classical IPR on Friday, March 3 at 6 PM to celebrate the 80th birthday of American composer Philip Glass. In February 2016, WFMT host Kerry Frumkin spoke with Glass about his life in music, where he’s been, and what’s inspired him. This program features their conversation, performances of several of Glass's compositions and recordings of works that have inspired Glass over the years.

It's become an annual tradition for NPR to host a live band in our studios for a full day. This year, we upped the ante and invited around 70 musicians from Washington, D.C.'s National Symphony Orchestra to play the musical interludes between stories on All Things Considered.

Grammy-award winner Bob James is well known for his jazz music, but recently just premiered his new piano concerto. Since December, he has had his piano at Interlochen Public Radio. That’s because he recorded a new album with Nancy Stagnitta, flute instructor at Interlochen. The duo is about to premiere their new work at a concert in the Dendrinos Chapel and Recital Hall here on the Interlochen campus. Fittingly, the album is called, “In the Chapel in the Moonlight.”

Bob and Nancy joined Kate Botello in Studio A to give us a preview. The concert will be held March 4 at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. For tickets, visit tickets.interlochen.org or call the Interlochen box office at 231-276-7800.


Photo by Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Massenet’s Werther starring tenor Vittorio Grigolo in the title role of the tortured young poet opposite mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard as the beautiful but unobtainable Charlotte. Edward Gardner leads the cast that also features Anna Christy as Charlotte’s younger sister Sophie, with David Bizic reprising the role of Albert and Maurizio Muraro as Le Bailli.

Listen LIVE on Classical IPR on Saturday, March 4 at 1pm ET.

After a five-year recording hiatus, the Gaudete Brass Quintet returns to the studio for its triumphant fourth album, "sevenfive: The John Corigliano Effect." Founded in 2004, the Gaudete Brass Quintet has distinguished itself for its dedication to both excellence in performance and promotion of brass chamber music and repertoire.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thanks to listeners in Harbor Springs, Buckley, Platte Lake, Gaborone (Botswana), and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Antonin Dvorak, “O Lovely Moon” from Rusalka; Seiji Ozawa/Boston Symphony Orchestra/Frederica von Stade

2. Gioacchino Rossini, Overture to William Tell; Charles Dutoit/Montreal Symphony Orchestra

3. John Adams, Harmonielehre, movement III; Michael Tilson Thomas/San Francisco Symphony Orchestra

4. Erik Satie, Gnossienes nos. 1-3; Klara Kormendi

"I feel your pain." The phrase might still be linked to Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign, but it's also an apt descriptor for a new project by The Crossing, the adventuresome Philadelphia-based choir, based on some very old music.

The 15th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, which takes place every four years, begins later this spring in Fort Worth, Texas. For the past six weeks, judges have been traveling the world to hear potential competitors audition. One notable stop is Moscow — where the American pianist for whom the contest is named stunned the world 59 years ago, winning the International Tchaikovsky Competition at the height of the Cold War.

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