Classical Music

Interlochen Public Radio is your gateway to news and classical music from Interlochen Center for the Arts. Learn about new music, upcoming performances and more.

Uppin' Adam, That's What I'm Talking About

Apr 18, 2014

This month on Radio Collage,  an excerpt from the short story  What I'm Talking About by creative writer Ashanti Davis, the Interlochen Arts Academy band performs Uppin' Adam and the Theatre Department  takes a fresh look at Cinderella.  The Academy Orchestra performs Elgar's Nimrod, pianist Grace Zhang plays Ondine by Ravel and we'll hear the opening of a Radio Drama based loosely, very loosely, on Shakespeare's Two Gentleman of Verona.  ( listen to the full drama here )
 


A Song Of Blessing: Tibetan Monks Perform Live

Apr 17, 2014

Several members of the Mystical Arts of Tibet stopped by Interlochen Public Radio for a conversation and performance live in Studio A today.  These Tibetan Buddhist monks are in Traverse City this week, constructing an elaborate sand painting at the Dennos Museum.

A German quartet calling themselves the Salut Salon is surging in social media right now with a bout of one-upwomanship that mixes together music, acrobatics and some good slapstick timing.

Johann Sebastian Bach wrote his St. Matthew Passion for a single purpose — to present the Passion story in music at Good Friday vesper services.

Bach's Passion continues to move audiences nearly three centuries after it was first heard in St. Thomas's Church in Leipzig, Germany. Standing as one of the pillars of Western sacred music, it is at once monumental and intimate, deeply sorrowful and powerful.

The spirit of collaboration is alive and well with Interlochen's upcoming New Opera Project.  Interlochen composing students worked in tandem with faculty and performers to create scenes for new operas.  The Parallel45 Production company came on board to produce, and the operas will make their world premieres at the Inside Out Gallery in Traverse City.

There are so many terrific shows coming up for the 2014 Interlochen Arts Festival; it's hard to keep track!  We like to think there's something for everyone. Chris Gruits, Executive Director of Interlochen Presents, dropped by Studio B to chat with Classical IPR's Kate Botello to talk about upcoming highlights from the Festival for classical music fans.
 

You're seated at the symphony. All the players but one are in place. You're ready for music. Then the first violinist enters to a round of applause and stands next to the conductor's podium while the oboist plays an A. The orchestra tunes up.

That ceremony is just one of many jobs for the concertmaster, Jonathan Carney says. He is the concertmaster of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

New Obama administration rules aimed at protecting African elephants are causing widespread anxiety in the music world. From country to classical, working musicians say the policy will make them think twice about touring abroad.

The proposed regulations would place a near-total ban on anything made with ivory moving in and out of the U.S.

Violinist Yevgeny Kutik was born in 1985 in the city of Minsk, in what is now Belarus. When he was 4 years old, his parents decided it was time to leave the country and come to America.

By now, you may have heard about Kwasi Enin, the impressive young man from Long Island who has been accepted into the classes of 2018 at Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, Yale (all eight Ivy League universities) as well as Duke and three campuses of the State University of New York.

Valkyries Ride All Night To Save Opera Company

Apr 1, 2014

(Happy April Fools 2014. See you next year.)

Music is an aural medium, but the two musicians represented on this album have careers defined, at least in part, by visuals. Valentina Lisitsa, the 44-year-old Ukrainian-born pianist, revived her stalled career by uploading videos of herself playing Chopin to YouTube. After millions clicked, she landed a record deal.

Kronos Quartet is celebrating 40 years of playing music together — and to mark the occasion, they're playing a celebration concert at Carnegie Hall in New York tomorrow night. Since their founding, the San Francisco-based string quartet has become one of the most visible ensembles in classical music. The players have done it by championing new and underheard music, and by coming up with a business model that was unheard of for a chamber group four decades ago.

We had so much fun taping cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble's Field Recording, we couldn't stop at just one selection, so we recorded the group's four talented percussionists in a deep groove.

When you're lucky enough to have cellist Yo-Yo Ma and members of the Silk Road Ensemble, some of the world's premiere instrumentalists and composers, gather for an afternoon of offstage music making, you've got to think long and hard about where to put them. And we decided that the perfect match would be ACME Studio, a theatrical props warehouse in Brooklyn.

Malta, the island nation 50 miles south of Sicily, may be small, but it's home to one of the biggest stars in opera, tenor Joseph Calleja. And like his country's name, which may originate in the Greek word for honey, Calleja's voice is a potent mix of Italianate passion and sweetness. Just listen to how he pulls the volume back to a slender golden ray of tone several times in Tosti's gorgeous "Ideale," and especially the word "disciogliea" in the Puccini aria that closes this performance.

For the millennium, in 2000 American composer John Adams completed a compelling, large-scale oratorio based on the nativity story called El Niño. Now he's composed a companion piece, The Gospel According to the Other Mary, a Passion oratorio mounted with his usual collaborator, the stage director and librettist Peter Sellars.

Johann Sebastian Bach, with his big white wig, might stand as the "supreme arbiter and lawgiver of music," as musicologist Nicolas Slonimsky says. But the composer, organist, choirmaster and teacher could also be surprisingly witty and irreverent.

Dolora Zajick discovered opera as a 22-year-old pre-med student. "That's when I discovered I had a voice," she tells Fresh Air host Terry Gross, "and I actually had a crack at a singing career. And I decided to take the chance."

Bless You!

Mar 18, 2014

We've all been there: You try (and try, and try) to hold back a sneeze, and nature prevails.

The human voice, the true original instrument, is still the most expressive and personal of all. It's one reason more than 42.5 million Americans sing in choirs, and why we seem to be hardwired to tell our stories through song. It also probably explains why I'm a vocal music junkie, eagerly pawing over the operas, recitals and choir albums that land on my desk and in my download folder.

From Jupiter To Coriolanus (and beyond!)

Mar 17, 2014
Tim Burke

In this edition of Radio Collage: the Interlochen Arts Academy Band brings us Jupiter from The Planets, the Percussion Ensemble tackles a piece by David Gillingham, and the Orchestra takes us to the opera with the Overture and some Ballet Music from Mozart's Idomeneo.  We'll also hear a scene from Shakespeare's Coriolanus, an original work from the Singer-Songwriter program, and a "jazzy" piece based on a Paganini Caprice.

       

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