Arts & Culture

 


Your grandparents' wedding picture. The letters your dad wrote home while he served in World War II. Your great-grandfather's citizenship papers.

These are precious links to our history. History is not so much about the "big names." It's more about what happens to everyday men, women and children.

But how many of us know how to preserve these treasures, whether digital or on ancient paper?

Sarah Jarosz in Concert on Classical IPR

Apr 23, 2017

Singer songwriter Sarah Jarosz has performed for sold out audiences in the U.S., the U.K. and Ireland, and she’s been featured on A Prairie Home Companion. Her contemporary folk and American roots music just won two Grammy Awards.

Detroit Symphony Orchestra LIVE this Friday

Apr 19, 2017

Leonard Slatkin conducts orchestral transcriptions of J.S. Bach, followed by two jazz-inspired DSO firsts!

Hear the orchestra's premiere performance of Shostakovich's Jazz Suite No. 1 and the debut of an all-new concerto by Grammy Award winning composer and pianist Michel Camilo. That's this Friday at 10:45 a.m. on Classical IPR.

25 years ago this month, a recent college graduate named Christopher McCandless hitchhiked to Alaska. He then hiked into the wilderness, using an old mountain road called the Stampede Trail.

A few months later, on Sept. 6, a hunter found him dead inside an old bus.

Writer Jon Krakauer told this puzzling story in his book Into the Wild which was later adapted into a 2007 film directed by Sean Penn and starring Emile Hirsch.

Now, the story of the young man who called himself "Alexander Supertramp" has been turned into a stage musical.

Into The Wild opens tomorrow night (Friday, April 14) at the Encore Musical Theatre Company in Dexter.

"One title. One state. And thousands engaged in literary discussion."

That's the motto of the Great Michigan Read.

Every other year, the Michigan Humanities Council announces its choice for the Great Michigan Read. The goal is to give people across the state a chance to connect by reading and talking about the same book. 

This year, the 2017 Great Michigan Read is X : A Novel by Ilyasah Shabazz and Kekla Magoon.

The Great Gatsby, an American classic, was published on this day in 1925.

The book sells half a million copies each year, totaling over 25 million copies sold since it was published. It’s been made into a movie five times. But author F. Scott Fitzgerald went to his grave thinking it was a flop.

For a centenarian, the Pulitzer Prize appears to be as spry as ever.

Now in its 101st year, the prestigious prize recognized writers, artists and musicians of nearly every bent — from breaking news and cartooning, to fiction and drama. At a New York City ceremony Monday, Pulitzer Prize Administrator Mike Pride announced the 21 winners of the 2017 award.

100 years ago this week, the United States officially entered what was then called "The Great War." We know it today as World War I.

It’s the cherry on top of the March Madness sundae.

When either Gonzaga or North Carolina emerges victorious tonight, "One Shining Moment" will play to close March Madness.

Happy 164th birthday to the man who is the personification of the "tortured artist."

Vincent Van Gogh was born on this day in 1853.

University of Michigan medical historian and PBS contributor Dr. Howard Markel joined Stateside to talk about some of the mysteries that still remain about this iconic artist. He started with the famous story of Van Gogh cutting off his own ear. 

It’s no wonder Jack Driscoll has been singled out as one of America’s greatest writers. The ten stories in his new book are elegantly written.

They’re suffused with beauty and mystery and a deep compassion for the rough, yet good-hearted people who live in northern Michigan. 

Quick quiz: What do Judy Garland's rendition of "Over the Rainbow," N.W.A's seminal Straight Outta Compton and the inaugural episode of NPR's All Things Considered have in common?

That little riddle just got a little easier to answer on Wednesday: The Library of Congress announced that all three "aural treasures" — along with roughly two dozen other recordings — have been inducted into its National Recording Registry.

The clock is ticking on Joe Louis Arena.

The Detroit Red Wings' final season at the Joe is down to just a handful of games. Next season finds them on the ice in the $600 million Little Caesars Arena.

After a handful of music and sporting events, that's it for Joe Louis Arena. It will be torn down for a new riverfront development.

Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley joined Stateside to talk about question she wants answered: After the arena is torn down, how will the city of Detroit honor such an iconic figure in the city's – and the country's – history? 

Live from Studio A – pianist Spencer Myer

Mar 17, 2017
Andrew Le

Piano soloist, Spencer Myer travels the world performing with orchestras, in solo recital and as a chamber musician. He says keeping and open mind and being versatile are keys to having a fulfilling life in music. Myer is in Northern Michigan this week and will be featured on Sunday with the Traverse Symphony Orchestra. He stopped by IPR’s Studio A to share  music and insights into his artistic experiences. 

National Writers Series: An evening with John Donvan

Mar 16, 2017

John Donvan wrote "In A Different Key: The Story of Autism" with co-author Caren Zucker. Donvan is a journalist who contributes to ABC News and Nightline. He's also the moderator for public radio's Intelligence Squared U.S. Donvan talks this hour with writer and mother of an autistic son Cari Noga. She asked Donvan how the story of autism begins.

You've heard of poetry slams, TED talks and the Moth. Now, we'll introduce you to PechaKucha 20x20, happening Thursday at Tenacity Brewing in Flint.

David Stanley, one of the organizers of the event, joined Stateside to explain what this presentation style is all about.  

This Friday, March 17, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will feature performances by the concerto competition winners. Chea Young Kang, a senior from South Korea, visited IPR's Studio A recently for a performance and conversation.

Ms. Kang won the concerto competition singing “Una Voce Poco Fa” from Rossini’s opera The Barber of Seville. She sang the piece in IPR's Studio A. 

The town of Williamston, in Ingham County, has a population just under four thousand people. Like many Michigan towns of its size, its downtown historic district boasts a variety of retail and dining establishments.

But nestled among the brick storefronts is a somewhat less-familiar sight: an 88-seat black box theater.

His name is Alex Petroski. He’s eleven years old. His best friend is the stray dog he adopted and named after his hero, astronomer Carl Sagan.

Together, they set out on a road trip to attend SHARF – that’s the (fictional) Southwest High-Altitude Rocket Festival. Along the way, Alex adds recordings to an iPod that he hopes will one day find the ears of extraterrestrials.

Alex is the central character in a newly-released young adult novel, See You in the Cosmos. Its author, Jack Cheng, immigrated to Michigan at age 5 and today lives in Detroit.

National Writers Series: An evening with Daniel Bergner

Mar 3, 2017

Daniel Bergner is the author of five books, including "In the Land of Magic Soldiers" and his latest, "Sing For Your Life," about African-American opera singer Ryan Speedo Green. He's also a journalist who writes for the New York Times Magazine and other publications. Bergner talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio music host and producer Kate Botello. She asked Bergner how he first heard about Ryan Speedo Green.

In the D.C. Comics universe, Superman has Metropolis, Batman has Gotham, and now Cyborg has Detroit.

When D.C. rebooted its universe a few years ago, the superhero Cyborg got a promotion. He joined Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman as part of the Justice League and has become a higher-profile character. 

Grammy-award winner Bob James is well known for his jazz music, but recently just premiered his new piano concerto. Since December, he has had his piano at Interlochen Public Radio. That’s because he recorded a new album with Nancy Stagnitta, flute instructor at Interlochen. The duo is about to premiere their new work at a concert in the Dendrinos Chapel and Recital Hall here on the Interlochen campus. Fittingly, the album is called, “In the Chapel in the Moonlight.”

Bob and Nancy joined Kate Botello in Studio A to give us a preview. The concert will be held March 4 at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. For tickets, visit tickets.interlochen.org or call the Interlochen box office at 231-276-7800.


 

When classic English poet John Keats coughed up blood in 1821, he knew it wasn’t a good sign. According to medical historian Dr. Howard Markel, Keats was able to diagnose the disease that would end his life: consumption.

The story of the Great Lakes is one of remarkable beauty and extraordinary violence.

According to the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum, the Lakes have collectively claimed some 6,000 ships and 30,000 lives. As long as ships have been on the Lakes, ferocious storms have been swallowing those ships—and their crews—whole.

It’s that grim yet compelling history that Cindy Hunter Morgan explores in her new collection of poems, Harborless. The collection is Morgan’s telling of 40 different Great Lakes shipping disasters, stretching across two centuries.  

The Academy Awards are coming up on February 28, and it's your turn to pick a winner!

Five films have been nominated for the Best Musical Score Oscar - which is your favorite? Listen to the scores and vote for the one YOU think should win the Oscar this year. See how your pick measures up with Academy voters!

We'll be featuring suites from the scores all week on Classical IPR.

Click through for links to the scores, and to vote in our poll!

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