Stateside

Monday-Thursday, 3pm on IPR News
  • Hosted by Cynthia Canty

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. The show is a production of our partner Michigan Radio. It focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

Tomorrow will be one for the history books, not just here in Michigan but across the nation.

Tuesday morning is when Federal Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes will rule whether or not Detroit is eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection.

Detroit News reporter Chad Livengood has covered the bankruptcy trial, and he joined us today to talk about what might happen tomorrow morning.

Listen to the full interview above.

On today's show, Amish in Michigan, Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr., an update on pharmaceutical compounding centers in the wake of the meningitis outbreak, and preserving the classic turkey.

*Listen to the audio above.

When you think of "The Amish" what comes to mind?

Horses? Buggies? Long dresses and bonnets? Long beards? No electricity?

Well, yes, there is all of that. But there is so much more to the Amish in America, and here in Michigan, where the Amish population numbers around 11,000.

We wanted to find out more about the Amish -- especially what the rest of us might learn from them.

Consider this: how does a one-room Amish schoolhouse - going only to eighth grade, with only a battery-powered clock in the way of "technology" - how do these schools turn out highly successful entrepreneurs whose firms gross annual sales in the million-dollar range?

I'm joined by Gertrude Enders Huntington joined us today. She’s a retired professor from the University of Michigan. She is the co-author of "Amish Children: Education in the Family, School, and Community.”

*Listen to the audio above.

Congress has passed new legislation to try to prevent another deadly fungal meningitis outbreak... But, will it be enough?

*Listen to the audio above.

All too often, as school districts are forced to cut spending, programs like music get the ax.

And that sorry fact robs students of the chance to learn music, to make music, and leaves one to wonder: Where are the musicians of the future going to come from?

One Ann Arbor Elementary School is teaming up with the University of Michigan School of Music for a unique approach to teaching music...and they are turning to Venezuela for inspiration.

It's called El Sistema.

The program originated in Venezuela, and the idea was to teach disadvantaged children, to help them discoverer the power of music.

I spoke with Professor John Ellis with the University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre and Dance, where among other things, he is Director of Community and Preparatory Programs - and Horacio Contreras Espionoza, he is a UofM grad student studying cello, and he is an El Sistema teacher at Mitchell Elementary School in Ann Arbor.

Some new data from the Census Bureau shows some intriguing migration patterns. Can you guess who's moving to Michigan, and where Michiganders are heading when they pack up and leave?

We’ll talk with demographer Kurt Metzger about what these trends mean for Michigan. Then, should we be mixing our private and professional lives? An intriguing study suggests you might want to think twice before putting up those cute family photos at work.

And, it’s official, Uncle Sam is pulling out of General Motors, and with the exit of the federal government by the end of the year, it's the end of “Government Motors.”

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes has plenty of thoughts about the pros and cons of the auto bailout, which stands as an unprecedented government intervention in a cornerstone industry.

It’s been more than a month since the Affordable Care Act’s insurance marketplace has open, and to say the rollout has been problematic would be an understatement.

With the glitch-ridden healthcare.gov website, and the natural confusion that comes with breaking new ground, it’s no wonder that many insurance-seekers don’t even know where to begin to find health insurance under the ACA.

Enter Don Hazaert, the director of Michigan Consumers for Healthcare. MCH is one of four navigator agencies in Michigan for Obamacare.

But what does a navigator do? What can’t they do? And where do Michiganders stand with their healthcare?

Hazaert met with us in the studio, to discuss how those looking for coverage for Michigan actually do it.

For more information, visit enrollmichigan.com or any of the websites below:

consumersforhealthcare.org

communitybridgesihc.com

accesscommunity.org

aihfs.org

Listen to the full interview above.

A recent study coming out of Michigan State University reaffirms the need for one educational discipline that’s been continuously cut over the past decade — the arts.

Researchers found a startling link between taking part in arts and crafts activities as a child and patents received or businesses launched as an adult.

According to that study, which examined MSU Honors STEM students between 1990-1995, 94% of STEM graduates had musical training in their lives, compared to 34% of all adults.

Joining us is one of the authors of the study, Rex LaMore, the director of the MSU Center for Community and Economic Development. Cynthia Taggart, a professor of Music Education at Michigan State also talked to us.

Listen to the full interview above.

In the weeks after the Detroit’s mayoral election, a top aide to Gov. Rick Snyder recently quipped that “adults” are now running Detroit’s city hall.

Does that point to a better working relationship between the governor, Detroit’s Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr, and the city’s Mayor-elect Mike Duggan?

Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes is taking a look at the relations between Detroit’s leadership and the governor’s office.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Ever since Detroit’s became the biggest in American history to seek bankruptcy protection, the term “death spiral” has been in the spotlight.

The spiral often begins with promises made to municipal workers. Pensions and health coverage are becoming too much for many cities and states to bear. But the law tells mayors and governors that those pension plans need to remain intact.

As pension costs mount, they try raising taxes, or turning to the municipal bond market. And when those doors are slammed shut, what happens? Essential services get cut, pink slips start flying, and businesses and homeowners get out of town, leaving behind a smaller and poorer population even less able to cover a city’s soaring costs.

Detroit sure has seen its share of challenges in the past

4o years, but all through that time the city has been home to one of the most vibrant regional opera companies in the nation: The Michigan Opera Theatre.

The founder of the MOT is Dr. David DiChiera.

He’s recently been named the 2013 Kresge Eminent Artist. That prize is the Kresge Foundation’s annual lifetime achievement award in the Arts.

It’s been called the most prestigious local prize in the field of culture. David, We welcomed David to the program today.

*Listen to the audio above.

Any day now, there will be a decision from Judge Steven Rhodes on whether to authorize Detroit’s Chapter 9 bankruptcy, and everyone paying attention to this historic ruling is wondering how he will rule.

But, here’s another question: What will it take to keep other cities and towns across Michigan safe from municipal bankruptcy? Later in the program we’ll talk with an expert who believe he has a solution.

Then, after 40 years, when many other cultural institutions shut their doors, the Michigan Opera Theatre remains one of the most vibrant regional opera companies in the nation.

We spoke with the Theatre's founder about the challenges that lie ahead. 

First on the show, whatever your political or social views about the Affordable Care Act, these things are true: It is here. There are people who have no health insurance who need it, and the rollout has been, to put it kindly, a disaster.

With the terrible performance of the healthcare.gov website, and the natural confusion that comes with breaking new ground, it's small wonder that many people don't even know where to start with seeking coverage under the ACA.

Don Hazaert is the director of Michigan Consumers for Healthcare, one of four navigator agencies in our state for Obamacare. We spoke with him about how these navigators can help.

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