Stateside

Monday-Thursday, 3pm on IPR News
  • Hosted by Cynthia Canty

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. The show is a production of our partner Michigan Radio. It focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

 

 

One month ago, President Trump tweeted, "Trade wars are good, and easy to win."

There’s an important part of the national conversation about violence against women that hasn’t received as much attention as it deserves: the role of men and boys in preventing domestic violence.

The torrent of death threats made an impression on the Washtenaw County jury because on Tuesday, that jury convicted Kevin Beverly of felonies for extorting and intimidating his ex-wife, Nicole.

Nicole Beverly first spoke with Stateside last summer. On Stateside, we heard her story of years of terrifying abuse, stalking, and threats from her ex, Kevin – including threats made while he was in prison, serving a five year sentence on a 2012 conviction for stalking Nicole.

Hope College is a small, private liberal arts college near Holland, in West Michigan.

It was founded in 1862 in partnership with the Reformed Church in America, so its Christian identity is central.

Safia Hattab, a freshman at Hope studying English and computer science, brings a different perspective to the school of over 3,300 students: she’s Muslim. Hattab turned her experience of being Muslim in West Michigan into an award-winning essay titled “Through the Dome.”

 

This winter driving season has created many white-knuckled moments throughout our state.  

If you find yourself thinking, “There’s got to be a better way to get around in the snow,” then you wouldn’t be the first. 

The scandal surrounding Michigan State University deepened last week with the arrest of the former dean of its College of Osteopathic Medicine, William Strampel.

Strampel was arraigned last week on charges of fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct, counts of misconduct in office, willful neglect of duty related to his failure to supervise sports doctor Larry Nassar, and accusations by four women of sexual harassment.

This is the time of year when For Sale signs start popping up with the spring crocuses and tulips. But the home-buying season might be a challenge this year in Grand Rapids, despite high home prices.

The Trump administration continues rolling back regulations set under the Obama administration. This time, it’s looking like it could be fuel-efficiency and pollution standards for the auto industry. These guidelines were one of President Obama's signature moves to fight climate change.

Is the Trump administration rolling back standards to a greater degree than auto companies expected? Michelle Krebs, a Detroit-based executive analyst for Autotrader, joined Stateside to discuss what this weakening of the federal targets could mean to the Michigan economy.

 

 

Kyla Carneiro, the Digital Communication Specialist for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi, joined Stateside to tell us about the tribe's podcast, Yajmownen, which she hosts and produces.

 

As controversy swirled around Bob Dylan's 2017 Nobel prize for literature, some argued that Dylan wasn't even the first songwriter to win the prize. That honor may belong to Indian songwriter, poet and philosopher Rabindranath Tagore.  

 

 

John U. Bacon, Michigan Radio sports commentator, joined Stateside to give us an update on everything going on with Michigan sports (and there is a lot).

The clock is ticking. CPAs and tax attorneys are working long hours right now as taxes are due in less than a month.

But what should we be doing now so that filing for 2018 goes smoothly, in light of the huge tax reform bill that was recently passed?

Macomb County Clerk Karen Spranger took office in January 2017, and there's been non-stop drama surrounding her ever since.

That drama hit a new high Tuesday when a judge ordered Spranger to be removed from her post.

Taking her place will be Kathy Brower, a long-time Macomb County employee. A judge appointed her temporary acting county clerk today.

Ever since the arrival of Europeans to Michigan, farming has been a key economic component for our state. However, without the life’s work of a Michigander from South Haven, farms in Michigan and across the nation might evolved quite differently.

Mark Harvey, State Archivist at the Michigan History Center, joined Stateside to discuss the life of pioneering botanist and horticulturist Liberty Hyde Bailey, how his “agrarian ideology” of advanced technology was received at the time, and how he’s remembered today.

Turning shame into pride.

That’s the idea behind an exhibit of black velvet paintings. It’s called “Black Velvet: A Rasquache Aesthetic,” and it’s happening at the Latino Cultural Center in Detroit's Mexicantown.

 

There are any number of custom design and fabrication companies, but Urban Ashes is different: It's the only one with the motto "reclaiming trees and lives."  

The Saline company makes a wide array of items for businesses and homes out of wood carefully salvaged from abandoned homes and businesses in the Detroit area.

 

That once-forgotten wood is then crafted by a once-forgotten workforce: ex-offenders and young people who are close to falling into that path that leads to jail or prison. 

 

 

This time, David Kiley of Encore Michigan brings us an eclectic mix of shows from theaters across Michigan.

 

Listen above to hear Kiley’s previews of the following shows:

The fallout from the Larry Nassar scandal at Michigan State University continues. Nassar’s boss and former Dean of MSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine, William Strampel, was arrested late Monday and arraigned Tuesday on felony and misdemeanor charges.

When Michigan’s economy tanked a decade ago, it stepped up a steady stream of young people leaving Michigan to seek work in Chicago.

Michael Ferro was one of those young Michiganders. His experience working for the federal government in the Windy City was the inspiration for his debut novel Title 13.

As America gets older, the question of who's going to care for Grandma and Grandpa becomes more complicated and more urgent. Consider this: the number of Americans over age 65 will more than double in less than 50 years.

Patricia Smith, a professor of economics at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, recently penned a piece for The Conversation that explores the future of “the daunting economics of elder care.”

How do you know if nursing homes, home health aides, and assisted living communities are treating you or your loved ones properly, and what do you do if they're not?

We'll have that conversation on Stateside soon, but first we need your questions.

Growing your own business means persisting past uncertainty and rejection: having a clear idea of what your product is about, and where you want to take your business.

Detroiter Melissa Butler is proof of that idea. She’s the founder and CEO of The Lip Bar. It is a non-toxic, cruelty-free and vegan line of lipsticks and lip-glosses.

The Trump administration has rolled out its plan to respond to violence and guns in our schools. It wants to provide firearms training to some teachers. But it has backed off on making major changes to gun legislation: For example, there’s nothing about raising the minimum age to buy guns from 18 to 21.

 

March Madness is upon us now that the NCAA has announced its 68-team field. Let those who love college hoops plunge into making their brackets. 

Kirk Steudle, director of the Michigan Department of Transportation recently joined Stateside to answer your questions about our roads.

It turns out, you had a lot of questions.

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