Morning Classical

Monday - Friday, 7am to 10am on Classical IPR

Join Kate Botello on Classical IPR weekday mornings from 7:00 to 10:00 a.m. Tune in for a wide variety of classical music with an occasionally eclectic bent - you might catch a show tune or a jazz standard here and there!

Kate also blogs about the birthdays of famous composers, offbeat facts in Classical music and other points of interest.  She hosts musical guests, interviews, and regularly invites expert community members to join her on-air to share their knowledge and love of music.

Kate's Morning Classical program has some regular features during the week, including -

Monday - Friday, 7:40 a.m. - The Kids' Commute

Tune in for classical music aimed to educate and entertain the younglings, trapped in the car on the way to school. Find out more about The Kids' Commute!

Tuesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Short Suites

Each Tuesday, Kate plays a "Short Suite" - two pieces of music that go together, in one way or the other.  Submit your own idea or learn more about Short Suites.

Wednesday mornings, 9:00 a.m. - Long Play Wednesday

Luxuriate in a full symphony or a nice, long concerto to help you get through Hump Day.

Friday mornings before 10:00 a.m. - Friday Dance Party!

Kickstart your weekend with the last piece of music that Kate plays on Friday mornings - dance tunes by way of the Renaissance, symphonic dances, or folk dance suites.

Peggy McNew gets up close and personal with her watercolor painting. She has cone dystrophy, and uses her lower peripheral vision to see.
Dan Wanschura

Peggy McNew is a painter from Empire, Michigan. There’s nothing unusual about that— there are a lot of painters in Leelanau County. But Peggy is different. She’s legally blind. 

And a question that she’s wrestled with is whether or not that matters in relation to her art.

A bowl carved from a tree that was downed by last year's August 2nd storm in Glen Arbor is one of the pieces waiting to be displayed in a new art exhibit at the Glen Arbor Art Association. The exhibit focuses on artists' interpretations of the storm.
Dan Wanschura

Beth Bricker is a painter from Glen Arbor. When she bought a home last summer, her property had a lot of trees on it. Then the infamous August 2nd storm, happened.

After waiting out the storm in her bathroom, she emerged to find a tree had landed in her bedroom and studio area.

In fact, she had five trees fall on her house, and seven more on her garage. Her property which used to be covered in trees, was suddenly wide open. She says she is going to miss all that shade.

“I’m a middle-aged woman," says Bricker. "I get too hot way too fast, and I’ve got ... high windows here which really didn’t used to have any sunlight coming in.”

But on the other hand she says she can now look up and see stars at night. Those types of new views are the inspiration behind a new exhibit at the Glen Arbor Art Association. 

New Views: A Storm of Art is a juried exhibition of art. The art association wanted to give artists an opportunity to express themselves and help the community heal.

The Accidentals released a new EP on June 1, titled Parking Lot. It’s been three years since the group released their last album, Bittersweet. Since then, the band has toured the country, been showcased at South by Southwest, and signed a new management deal.

The group's appearance at SXSW earlier this year, was the second straight year the group traveled to Austin, Texas. Katie Larson says the event is beneficial for indie bands like theirs because it's a chance to network.

"We did get to meet a lot of people this year, and that was a really good focus," she says. "And we made a lot of good connections that'll help us out for this next year or two."

Dave Miles, a curator at the Charlevoix Historical Society, stands by a new fishing industry display. It's part of a new exhibit focusing on the history of business and industry in Charlevoix.
Dan Wanschura

When Neil Armstrong first stepped on the moon in 1969, a little bit of Charlevoix was with him. 

Charlevoix made it to the moon in the form of a very tiny, lightweight chrome and nickel thread. The thread was manufactured by a Charlevoix company named Hoskins, and was used in the Apollo Space Program space suits.

That's the kind of historical link that might not be well known, but something that a new exhibit at the Charlevoix Historical Society seeks to make known.

John Larson is the owner of one of Traverse City's newest restaurants, Mama Lu's.
Dan Wanschura

When chef John Larson and his family moved from Chicago to Traverse City last spring, he soon realized that getting a table at a downtown restaurant was a bit difficult at times.

"There weren't enough restaurants," says Larson. "I noticed every single place was on a two-hour wait during the summer months."

That was good news for the entrepreneur from Chicago. 

Just over a year later, Mama Lu's is now open for business just in time for the busy summer months in Traverse City.

Poet Mike Delp addresses a men's gathering in Cedar, Michigan. He recently authored a new collection of poetry called, 'Lying in the River's Dark Bed.'
Dan Wanschura

On a recent Saturday evening in Cedar, Michigan, about 40 guys are gathered in the home of Jeff Smith, the editor of Traverse magazine. The night is centered around beer and poetry. The beverage of choice is from the recently opened Lake Ann Brewing Company. The poet is Mike Delp.

Mike Delp has a new book titled Lying in the River’s Dark Bed. It’s what he calls the confluence of the Deadman and the Mad Angler— characters he’s has been crafting for years.  

 

Interlochen Arts Academy

On June 5, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra and Dance Company will perform at David Geffen Hall in NYC as part of the NY Phil Biennial. Christopher Rountree is a young American conductor and composer committed to bringing contemporary music to a broader audience.  He will be conducting the Orchestra for the Biennial in June and has visited campus a number of times to work with the students in preparation for the performance.


Mary Sue Wilkinson leads a sing-along session at Orchard Creek Supportive Care in Traverse City. Residents who suffer from dementia are still able to connect with the music from years before.
Dan Wanschura


Mary Sue Wilkinson remembers how sad she felt when she used to visit her father-in-law who was suffering from dementia. He was a former minister, but near the end of his life he couldn’t talk. 

Whether out of desperation or instinct, Mary Sue took her guitar and started to sing the old Gospel hymn, I’ll Fly Away. He made eye contact and began to sing along. 

"He sang every word in perfect harmony; perfect pitch," says Mary Sue. "He was so happy you could just see that he was experiencing the competence of that.” 

Interlochen Arts Academy

  On June 5, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will perform at Lincoln Center for the New York Philharmonic biennial. Between now and then, the composers, choreographer and guest conductor will be working with students here at Interlochen, preparing the program for their trip to New York. 

This week we talked to composer Hannah Lash, who was on campus to work with students on her newly commissioned piece Chaconnes​.

Jema Hewitt says if you see someone wearing a pair of goggles with a top hat, you've spotted a steampunk.
"It's kind of like a secret sign," says Hewitt. "If you spot someone, and they're wearing a pair goggles like you would an Alice band, you kind of go, 'Ahah, you're a steampunk!'"


Big Samir (left) and Aja Black (right) of The Reminders in studio with DJ Man-o-Wax.
Antar Hanif - iAMSHOOTER.COM

Aja Black says that misogyny and violence often show up in hip-hop music. But she believes the reason we have that subject matter in the music is because it’s reflective of our current culture.

“So, what we’re trying to do with our hip-hop music is just show that there’s a perspective that’s not being put into the mainstream media that’s positive and encouraging,” explains Black. “Inviting people to get along with one another and to love one another.”

Black and her husband Big Samir form the hip-hop group The Reminders. The group is in Traverse City performing as a part of Caravansarai. It’s a tour bringing Muslim-American performers to different parts of the country to share contemporary creative expressions.

Jonatan Myhre Jørgensen in rehearsal for the upcoming NY Phil Bienn
Interlochen Arts Academy

On June 5, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will perform at Lincoln Center for the New York Philharmonic biennial. Between now and then, the composers, choreographer and guest conductor will be working with students here at Interlochen, preparing the program for their trip to New York. 

This week we feature Jonatan Myhre Jørgensen, one of six students from the Interlochen Arts Academy Dance Company chosen to premiere Christopher Williams' The Good So Far for the Biennal.

On April 18, 2016, Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton won the Pulitzer Prize for drama. It is only the ninth musical to ever win in the drama category, joining previous winners such as South Pacific, A Chorus Line, and Rent.  

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro will be part of the Young Americans focus during the 2016 Interlochen Arts Festival.
Jake Shimabukuro

Huey Lewis and the News, Martina McBride, and Jay Leno are some of the bigger names coming to Interlochen this summer.

The 2016 Interlochen Arts Festival lineup was announced today.

In addition to some of the more widely recognized names, this year's festival also showcases some of America's next generation of artists. Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro, who's from Hawaii, will be making an appearance as will Detroit poet Danez Smith.

On Thursday, Maestro James Levine announced that he would be leaving his position as the Music Director of the Metropolitan Opera. Levine, 72, has served as Music Director at the Met since 1976. He has had numerous issues with his health lately, including multiple sclerosis as well as a spinal injury that forced him to miss two entire seasons. Levine has conducted over 2500 performances during his tenure, including the Met’s recent production of Giuseppe Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra.

Natalie Douglas is an award-winning cabaret singer from New York, and is out with a new album.
Natalie Douglas

If you have your portrait hanging on the Birdland Jazz Club Wall of Fame, you’re kind of a big deal.

Natalie Douglas is an award-winning singer who has her picture hanging in the legendary New York City establishment, and yes, she’s a big deal in the world of cabaret. 

Earlier this year, she released a new album, Human Heart.

Natalie Douglas says creating an album using classic, cabaret songs, was pretty straightforward for her.

"Selecting songs for the cd was really easy," explains Douglas. "They're 12 songs I truly love and that I wanted to sing and do in this way."

On June 5, the Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra will perform at Lincoln Center for the New York Philharmonic biennial.  The biennial is a festival dedicated to new music and the students will not be playing standard repertoire. There are two world premieres commissioned for the performance and two NY premieres all by young American composers.

Mei Stone will perform with 'The President's Own' United States Marine Band, this Sunday in Washington, D.C.
Dan Wanschura

This time of year can be an especially busy time for seniors in high school. There are all kinds of things going on — exams, dances, senior skip days, college applications and so on.

It’s even more hectic when you’re a top-notch young musician like Mei Stone, a senior studying flute performance at Interlochen Arts Academy. 


April Fool's Day likely originated in the Netherland's at the beginning of the 16th century.
Yanik Chauvin / istockphoto.com

One of the better April Fool’s Day pranks in recent memory happened right here in Michigan just a couple years ago. A group of seven students at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids decided to prank their economics professor. Turns out, the professor had a policy about cell phones in the classroom— if your phone rang during class, you had to answer the call on speaker phone in front of everybody.

Taylor Nefcy was a theater major at Aquinas, and she came up with the idea of using that rule to her advantage in creating a prank. 

Penny (left) and Radel Rosin of Oh Brother Big Sister are out with their first original album.
Dan Wanschura

Just a couple years ago, Penny and Radel Rosin were performing in separate bands. The two siblings from Grayling, Michigan had grown up in a musical family and had gotten used to the performance life at an early age. But, being in a band with multiple members and schedules can be difficult to coordinate at times. That was a big reason why Radel eventually approached Penny about creating their own music act.

“Yeah, Del just pretty much just called me up and he said, ‘We’re going to start a duo, and we’re going to call it Oh Brother Big Sister,’” Penny recalls. “And I said, ‘Alright, sounds good.’”

Welcome to Episode 16 of Show Tunes with Kate Botello! This week: spring is here - at least according to clocks and official types. And nobody gets the whole spring thing better than Rodgers and Hammerstein...or Rodgers and Hart!

We’ll hear tunes from a couple of current hits, and  - at Intermission - FORBIDDEN BROADWAY goes after LES MISERABLES not once - but twice!

Click through for this week's playlist and to find out how to hear your voice on the show!


Jay Allison is an award-winning independent broadcast journalist. He produces 'The Moth Radio Hour.'
dancutrona.com

Imagine several raconteurs relaxing on a front porch swapping true tales on a warm summer night in Georgia. There's probably plenty of iced tea, maybe a few cans of beer, and the occasional fluttering of a moth's wings can be heard as it flies to the cozy glow of the porch light.

Those laid-back, informal gatherings eventually gave rise to The Moth storytelling events, which are now held around the world. The format remains simple — live stories told by everyday people without notes. The show stops in Traverse City on Friday night at the City Opera House.

'American Dad!' creative designer Jim Feeley shows off his rough sketch IPR's Kate Botello.
Dan Wanschura

Jim Feeley has always liked to paint, draw and doodle. But once he graduated from high school, art school wasn’t even anywhere on his horizon. He enrolled at Boston College and graduated with an English Literature degree. He didn't really think that his hobby would be a viable career.

Eventually, he moved across country to Los Angeles and worked for Film Roman— the studio responsible for shows like The Simpsons and King of the Hill. Once a week the studio would host a free drawing workshop. Even though Jim was working in production, he decided to give the workshop a try.

Longtime Detroit Tigers broadcaster Ernie Harwell.
mwlguide via Wikimedia Commons

Spring is in the air! 

Or, at least Spring Training is in the air.

Before the first pitch, baseball fans expect to hear the national anthem performed by countless individuals throughout the long season.

The 88th Academy Awards ceremony takes place Sunday evening.
Davidlohr Bueso / flickr

Meg Weichman doesn’t get to vote in the Oscars. But the creative director for the Traverse City Film Fest still has plenty of hot takes on the 88th Academy Awards ceremony on Sunday.

This year, eight films were nominated for Best Picture. Out of those eight, Meg says three really separate themselves from he rest of the group: The Revenant, Spotlight and The Big Short.

 


Pages