Amanda Sewell

Classical Music Host

Amanda Sewell is a musicologist who holds a Ph.D. in musicology from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. As a musicologist, Amanda researches the history, context, and style of music of many different periods and regions. Her research about music has appeared in textbooks, journals, and music encyclopedias, and she is a frequent presenter at academic music conferences all over the country. Amanda frequently contributes program notes for performances of classical music, including performances at Interlochen Center for the Arts.

When not in the studio at Interlochen Public Radio, Amanda works as an academic editor and consultant. Amanda lives in Traverse City with her husband and two dogs.

Museum of Modern Art

Thank you to listeners in Northport, Cheboygan, Petoskey, Traverse City and many other places for your requests this week. 

1. Antonin Dvorak, Symphony no. 4 (third movement); Libor Pesek/Czech Philharmonic Orchestra

2. Giacomo Puccini, “Nessun dorma” from Turandot; Luciano Pavarotti

3. Miller & Miller, “Let there be peace on earth”; Lowell Graham/US Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants

4. Johann Sebastian Bach, Concerto for 2 Keyboards; Robert & Gaby Casadesus/Zurich Chamber Orchestra

A new album from mezzo soprano Cecilia Bartoli and cellist Sol Gabetta features the unique relationship between the voice and the cello in music from the Baroque period. Bartoli and Gabetta have been friends for years, and this is the first project they have collaborated on.

calidorestringquartet.com

The Calidore String Quartet is one of the most remarkable young string quartets on the classical music scene today. In 2016, they won the M-Prize International Chamber Music Competition, which came with a $100,000 grand prize. They’ve been recognized as a Lincoln Center Emerging Artist, and BBC Radio 3 has named them a New Generation Artist. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thank you to listeners in Benzonia, Big Rapids, Mesick, Cheboygan, Old Mission Peninsula and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Antonin Dvorak, Symphony no. 8 (first movement); Marin Alsop/Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

2. Hector Berlioz, Symphony fantastique (second movement); Daniel Barenboim/Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra

3. Ralph Vaughan Williams, The Lark Ascending; Neville Marriner/Academy of St Martin in the Fields/Iona Brown

4. Gustav Mahler, Symphony no. 3 (excerpt of sixth movement); Leonard Bernstein/New York Philharmonic

Pianist Liza Stepanova has a new album called Tones and Colors that explores the relationship between music and visual art. Each of the thirteen pieces she plays is either inspired by a specific work of art or else the piece of music later inspired a work of art. 

The liner notes for the album include images of each work of art and an explanation of how the art is related to the piece Stepanova plays.

Photo by Rich Polk

Building your own instruments from scraps of metal, playing a conch shell with your mouth like a trumpet and making music with spaghetti strainers purchased at IKEA - all of these are just another day's work for percussionist Rob Dillon.

Sony Classical has just released the Vienna Philharmonic's 2018 New Year's Concert. Riccardo Muti conducted this year's concert, his fifth time leading the New Year's Concert since 1993. 

Steve Riskind

Pianist Richard Goode is one of the leading interpreters of Beethoven's music alive today. He has recorded all of Beethoven's piano sonatas and piano concertos.

Bavarian State Painting Collection, Munich

Thank you to listeners in Indian River, Glen Arbor, Harbor Springs, Onekama and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Ludwig van Beethoven, Symphony no. 5 (fourth movement); Kent Nagano/Montreal Symphony Orchestra

2. Victor Herbert, Thine Alone; Andre Kostelanetz/London Symphony Orchestra/Beverly Sills

3. Gabriel Faure, Pavane; Eiji Oue/Minnesota Orchestra

4. Johann Sebastian Bach, Come Sweet Death; Virgil Fox (1971 San Francisco live performance)

Scottish classical guitarist Matthew McAllister has a new album out that features all American music. The album is called "American Collection," but there’s not a note of Copland or Bernstein on it. Instead, McAllister features pieces by American composers such as Chick Corea, Philip Glass and even Frank Zappa.

After major upgrades to classical music stations WIAB 88.5 FM and WIAA 88.7 FM, music from Classical IPR is now blanketing northwest lower Michigan, from Manistee to the U.P. and all places in-between.

Thanks to this expanded broadcasting range, Interlochen Public Radio will no longer broadcast from WICV, 100.9 FM, as the signal being transmitted from this East Jordan location is now covered by the new expanded broadcast range of 88.5 and 88.7.

Dmitri Shostakovich composed the score to the Soviet film “The Gadfly” in 1955. The complete score to the film has just been released for the first time.

 

Wellcome Collection

Thanks to listeners in Traverse City, Honor, Petoskey, Ann Arbor, Afton and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Scott Joplin, Magnetic Rag & Maple Leaf Rag; Joshua Rifkin

2. Henri Vieuxtemps, Violin Concerto no. 5 (first movement); Sir Colin Davis/London Symphony Orchestra/Isabelle van Keulen

3. Samuel Barber, Hesitation Tango; Gloria Cheng

4. Bernard Herrmann, North by Northwest Overture; Esa-Pekka Salonen/Los Angeles Philharmonic

5. Alberich Zwyssig, Swiss Psalm (national anthem); Peter Breiner/Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra

Swedish composer and pianist Benny Andersson is best known as a co-founder of the band ABBA. He also wrote music for the musicals "Chess," "Kristina från Duvemåla" and "Mamma Mia!" 

Andersson has a new album out on Deutsche Grammophon featuring 21 of his songs. He arranged and performed the music on solo piano. The music includes ABBA hits, songs from his musicals and several original compositions. 

Friday night at 6 p.m., tune in for the premiere broadcast of MSU in Concert on Classical IPR.

Hosted by Peter Whorf of WKAR in East Lansing, MSU in Concert is a weekly program featuring faculty artists, student ensembles and guests. The performances were recorded in locations including Cook Recital Hall, Fairchild Theatre and Wharton Center Cobb Great Hall on the Michigan State University campus.

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine has just released her 36th album. She pairs violin concertos by Max Bruch and Sir Edward Elgar. These two pieces are the shortest (the Bruch is about 20 minutes) and longest (the Elgar is about 50 minutes) of violin concertos in the standard repertoire. 

Photo by Dario Cantatore/Getty Images

American pianist Byron Janis has been a powerhouse since 1942, when he played Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2 with conductor Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Orchestra. Janis was just fifteen years old.

The following year, Vladimir Horowitz accepted Janis as his very first piano student. Janis would go on to play with some of the greatest conductors and orchestras of the twentieth century, including Fritz Reiner, Antal Dorati, Kirill Kondrashin and Charles Munch.

 American pianist Byron Janis has performed with some of the greatest conductors of the twentieth century, including Arturo Toscanini, Eugene Ormandy and Fritz Reiner. He was also the first piano student (and one of only three total) that Vladimir Horowitz ever accepted. At the age of 89, Janis is releasing not one but three new albums.

 

This week, Performance Today will feature two different performances given at Interlochen.

On Thursday, hour 2 of the program (during the 11 a.m. and 9 p.m. hours) will include music performed by pianist Conrad Tao.

On Friday, hour 1 of the program (during the 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. hours) will include music performed by the string quintet Sybarite5.

Interlochen Public Radio has a new and improved mobile app. Use it to stream IPR News and Classical IPR. You can also read the latest stories from Northern Michigan and around the world.

Find the app on iTunes or Google Play by searching for "Interlochen Public Radio."

 Soprano Pretty Yende grew up in a small town 200 miles from Johannesburg, South Africa. After hearing the famous “Flower Duet” by Leo Delibes in a television commercial, Yende decided to become an opera singer.

Creative Commons CC0

Join Classical IPR's Kate Botello, Nancy Deneen and Amanda Sewell on New Year's Eve starting at 10 p.m. They'll have plenty of classical music and conversation, a countdown to midnight and then a reflective start to 2018. This program airs from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Twitter @rebecaomordia

2017 was an exciting year for new albums in classical music. There were world premieres of pieces by Bartok, Puccini and Vaughan Williams. There were also lots of anniversaries celebrated in music, from the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation to the 40th anniversary of the founding of the Emerson String Quartet.  

Join Classical IPR's Amanda Sewell for a look at some notable classical music releases from 2017. This program airs Wednesday December 27 at 5 p.m. with an encore presentation on Monday January 1 at 1 p.m.

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Celebrate Christmas Day on Classical IPR with recent holiday concerts from around Northern Michigan. Local concerts are listed below.

View Classical IPR's complete holiday season program schedule by clicking here.

Christmas Day 2017

8 a.m.: Great Lakes Chamber Orchestra's Messiah plus Bach & Rutter

Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thank you to listeners in Gaylord, Cedar, Northport, Wolverine and many other places for your requests this week.

1. Various, Happy Holidays Medley; Keith Lockhart/Boston Pops Orchestra & Tanglewood Festival Chorus

2. Dan Forrest, Carol of Joy; Ronald Staheli/BYU Choirs and Orchestra

3. Traditional, Lord of the Dance; John Langstaff/Christmas Revels

4. Sergei Prokofiev, Piano Concerto no. 4 (third and fourth movements); Andre Previn/London Symphony Orchestra/Vladimir Ashkenazy

5. Leon Boellmann, Toccata from Gothic Suite; Carlo Curley

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