National Writers Series: An evening with Hampton Sides

22 hours ago

On this program from the National Writers Series, Hampton Sides explains why he's drawn to war. Sides is the author of "Ghost Soldiers, which tells the story of how U.S. soldiers rescued POWs from a Japanese prison camp in World War II. His latest book is called "In the Kingdom of Ice." It recounts the polar voyage of the USS Jeannette and the crew's battle for survival.

A gesture to astonish the world

23 hours ago

This week the constellation of the herdsman is setting, the hunter is rising, and the Moon will cascade down a stairway of morning planets like Cinderella come to the ball.

IPR asked listeners like you for program input, and as a result we've added new shows and rescheduled old favorites. IPR News Radio now includes more airings of TED Radio HourStudio 360 and Splendid Table on the weekends, and IPR Classical has added Show Tunes with Kate Botello, Global VillageRiverwalk Jazz and The New Jazz Archive

After covering the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan for NPR, author Sarah Chayes decided to stay in the country and start a non-profit. The many types of corruption Chayes witnessed there firsthand, led her to write the book, Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security. She argues that while everyone around the world agrees corruption is bad, it’s a subject that usually get’s pushed to the back burner.

“We’re under-appreciating the degree to which a lot of the turmoil we’re seeing the world today is actually sparked by indignation at acute public corruption,” says Chayes. 


Wine grape harvest may be at all-time low this year

Sep 30, 2015
Peter Payette

It’s harvest time for wine grapes. But after one of the worst growing seasons in northern Michigan, there aren’t many grapes to make into wine.

Duke Elsner, the small fruit educator for Michigan State University extension, says, "It’s really the worst season we’ve ever seen since the mid-70’s when they started growing wine grapes in northern Michigan."

He says the extreme cold winter wiped out about 50 percent of the grape buds. Then roughly 50 percent of remaining buds were damaged in a late spring frost in May.