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David Cassleman

Bergman hosts boisterous town hall in Gaylord

Northern Michigan’s congressman faced a raucous crowd at a town hall meeting in Gaylord Thursday night. There was lots of booing and some cheering for Rep. Jack Bergman (R-Watersmeet) at the event. Constituents asked him about Russian meddling in the election, health care, and the Great Lakes, among other issues.

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Peter Payette

Peter Payette wanted to offer listeners a chance to get to know their public radio hosts a little better during our spring drive. So he hosted an online round of Show and Tell on Facebook this week. Kate Botello explains the subculture of Unicornos. Aaron Selbig shows how he prevents boredom at work. Morgan Springer suggests IPR staff aren’t as funny as they used to be. And much more.
 

David Cassleman shows our disciplined approach to avoiding clichés in our writing.

Tomorrow evening at 7pm, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality is holding a public hearing on a request from Nestle Waters. 

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Join Classical IPR this Friday, April 14 at 6 PM for a special inspired by the liturgy of Christian Holy Week. The liturgy of the Christian Holy Week has inspired centuries of music from diverse composers and is rich with musical depictions and meditations reflecting on the death and suffering of Christ. WFIU's Harmonia presents an hour of music for Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday, and Good Friday services that lead up to Easter. 

It is the end of multiple eras for sports fans in Michigan and specifically metro Detroit. Last night, the Detroit Red Wings played their final game at Joe Louis Arena, a place they have called home since 1979.

Tonight, the Detroit Pistons will play their last home game at the Palace of Auburn Hills, an arena where they've played since 1988.

Du Yun, a 39-year-old composer, musician and performance artist, today won the Pulitzer Prize for music for her opera Angel's Bone. The Pulitzer jury describes the piece as a bold work "that integrates vocal and instrumental elements and a wide range of styles into a harrowing allegory for human trafficking in the modern world." Angel's Bone, which has a libretto by the versatile Royce Vavrek (Missy Mazzoli's Breaking the Waves and David T.

For a centenarian, the Pulitzer Prize appears to be as spry as ever.

Now in its 101st year, the prestigious prize recognized writers, artists and musicians of nearly every bent — from breaking news and cartooning, to fiction and drama. At a New York City ceremony Monday, Pulitzer Prize Administrator Mike Pride announced the 21 winners of the 2017 award.

Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Verdi’s Aida, starring Krassimira Stoyanova in the title role of the enslaved Ethiopian princess. Conducted by Italian maestro Daniele Rustioni, who makes his Met debut this season, the opera also stars Violeta Urmana as Aida’s formidable rival Amneris, Riccardo Massi as the Egyptian war hero Radamès, and George Gagnidze as Aida’s father Amonasro, with James Morris as the high priest Ramfis and Soloman Howard as the King of Egypt.

Listen LIVE on Classical IPR on Saturday, April 15 at 1pm ET.

Some Republicans in Michigan are pushing for restrictions to the state’s power to write regulations. State agencies, like the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, write many rules and regulations that don't need legislative approval. 

In the last few years, some Michigan lawmakers have criticized this process. They say that state departments are writing rules that are too strict.

Legislation introduced by one of northern Michigan’s state representatives, Rep. Triston Cole (R-Mancelona), would add a new hurdle for state agencies to clear.    

“This would restrict them from enacting administrative rules that would be stricter than federal rules,” Cole says, “without clear and convincing evidence, and or going through the legislative process.”

Cole spoke with IPR News Radio about the legislation:

 


It's a curious thing how ancient music can sometimes sound so contemporary. Listen to "Morgunstjarna," and it's as if three centuries' worth of music history evaporates. The anonymous song from 17th-century Iceland sports a catchy, bittersweet melody and rhythmic hook that pop outfits like Peter Bjorn and John might be happy to whistle.

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